Etymology
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lima bean (n.)
1756, associated with Lima, Peru, from which region the plant (Phaseolus lunatus) was introduced to Europe c. 1500. Among the earliest New World crops to be known in the Old World, Simmonds' "Dictionary of Trade" (1858) describes it as "esteemed," but it has the consistency of a diseased dog kidney.
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bel paese (n.)
proprietary name of a type of mild, creamy cheese, 1935, Italian literally "beautiful country or region."
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nota bene 

a Latin phrase meaning "mark well, observe particularly," 1721, from Latin nota, second person singular imperative of notare "to mark" (from nota "mark, sign, note, character, letter;" see note (n.)) + bene "well" (see bene-). Often abbreviated N.B.

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teddy bear (n.)

1906, named for U.S. president Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt (1858-1919), a noted big-game hunter, whose conservationist fervor inspired a comic illustrated poem in the New York Times of Jan. 7, 1906, about two bears named Teddy, whose names were transferred to two bears presented to the Bronx Zoo that year. The name was picked up by toy dealers in 1907 for a line of "Roosevelt bears" imported from Germany. Meaning "big, lovable person" first attested 1957, from the song popularized by Elvis Presley.

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beaux arts (n.)
"the fine arts," 1821, from French; also in reference to Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, and the widely imitated conventional type of art and architecture advocated there.
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beat off (v.)
"drive (something) away by violent blows," 1640s, from beat (v.) + off (adv.). Meaning "masturbate" is recorded by 1960s.
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bean bag (n.)
also bean-bag, "bag filled with beans," 1871 as an object in children's games, 1969 in reference to a type of chair. From bean (n.) + bag (n.).
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bee's knees (n.)
1923, a survivor of a fad around this year for slang terms denoting "excellence" and based on animal anatomy. Also existed in the more ribald form bee's nuts. Other versions that lasted through the century are cat's whiskers (1923), cat's pajamas, cat's meow. More obscure examples are canary's tusks, cat's nuts and flea's eyebrows. The fad still had a heartbeat in Britain at the end of the century, as attested by the appearance of dog's bollocks in 1989. Bee's knee was used as far back as 1797 for "something insignificant."
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bete noire (n.)
"person or thing regarded with especial aversion," 1844, from French bête noire, literally "the black beast." For bête see beast; noire is from Latin niger (see Negro).
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small beer (n.)
1560s, originally "weak beer;" used figuratively of small things or trifling matters. Small with the meaning "of low alcoholic content" is attested from mid-15c.
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