Etymology
Advertisement
aviation (n.)

"art or act of flying," 1866, from French aviation, noun of action from stem of Latin avis "bird" (from PIE root *awi- "bird"). Coined 1863 by French aviation pioneer Guillaume Joseph Gabriel de La Landelle (1812-1886) in "Aviation ou Navigation aérienne."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
*awi- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "bird." It also might be the source of *wyo, *yyo, Proto-Indo-European words for "egg."

It forms all or part of: auspex; auspices; auspicious; avian; aviary; aviation; aviator; avicide; aviculture; aviform; caviar; cockney; egg (n.); ocarina; oo-; oocyte; oolite; oology; osprey; ostrich; oval; ovary; ovate (adj.); oviform; oviparous; ovoviviparous; ovoid; ovulate; ovulation; ovule; ovum.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit vih, Avestan vish, Latin avis "bird;" Greek aietos "eagle;" Old Church Slavonic aja, Russian jajco, Breton ui, Welsh wy, Greek ōon, Latin ovum, Old Norse egg, Old High German ei, Gothic ada all meaning "egg."

Related entries & more 
climb (n.)
1580s, "act of climbing," from climb (v.). Meaning "an ascent by climbing" is from 1915, originally in aviation.
Related entries & more 
Spad (n.)
French biplane fighter of World War I, 1917, from French spad, from acronym of Societé pour Aviation et ses Dérivés.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
preflight (adj.)

also pre-flight, "of or pertaining to the preparations for a flight," 1918 with reference to aviation, from pre- + flight (n.).

Related entries & more 
evasive (adj.)
1725 of persons; 1744 of actions, etc., from French évasif, from Latin evas-, past participle stem of evadere "to get away, escape" (see evasion). Related: Evasively; evasiveness. Evasive action is from 1940, originally in military aviation.
Related entries & more 
aero- 

word-forming element meaning "air, atmosphere; gases," in 20c. use with reference to aircraft or aviation, from Greek aēr (genitive aeros) "air, lower atmosphere" (see air (n.1)).

Related entries & more 
zoom (v.)
1886, of echoic origin. Gained popularity c. 1917 as aviators began to use it. As a noun from 1917. The photographer's zoom lens is from 1936, from the specific aviation sense of zoom as "to quickly move closer."
Related entries & more 
firebomb (n.)
also fire-bomb, 1895 (earlier as a type of fireworks and a type of cannonball), from fire (n.) + bomb (n.). As a verb, from 1950 as an act of vandalism or terrorism, from 1941 as a military aviation tactic. Related: Firebombed; firebombing.
Related entries & more