Etymology
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aversion (n.)
Origin and meaning of aversion

1590s, "a turning away from;" 1650s in the figurative sense of "mental attitude of repugnance or opposition," from French aversion (16c.) and directly from Latin aversionem (nominative aversio), noun of action from past-participle stem of aversus "turned away, backwards, behind, hostile," itself past participle of avertere "to turn away" (see avert). Aversion therapy in psychology is from 1946.

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batrachophobia (n.)
"aversion to frogs and toads," 1863, from Greek batrakhos "a frog" + -phobia.
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Negrophobe (n.)

"one who has violent aversion to or hatred of Negroes," 1864, from Negro + -phobe. Often pejorative.

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melancholia (n.)

"mental condition characterized by great depression, sluggishness, and aversion to mental action," 1690s, from Modern Latin melancholia (see melancholy).

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disinclination (n.)

"want of propensity, desire, or affection; slight dislike or aversion," 1640s; see dis- + inclination.

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misogynist (n.)

"a woman-hater, one who has an aversion to women in general," 1610s, from Greek misogynēs "woman-hater" (see misogyny).

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Negrophobia (n.)

"violent aversion to or hatred of Negroes," 1819, in U.S. Congressional debates over admitting slavery into Arkansas Territory, from Negro + -phobia.

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abhorrence (n.)

"feeling of extreme aversion or detestation," 1650s; see abhorrent + -ence. OED recommends this form for "act or fact of abhorring," abhorrency (c. 1600) for "quality of being abhorrent."

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sitophobia (n.)
"morbid aversion to food" (or certain foods), 1882, from Greek sitos "wheat, corn, meal; food," of unknown origin, + -phobia. Related: Sitophobe; sitophobic.
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hubbub (n.)
1550s, whobub "confused noise," of uncertain origin; according to OED generally believed to be of Irish origin, perhaps from Gaelic ub!, expression of aversion or contempt, or Old Irish battle cry abu, from buide "victory."
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