Etymology
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auto (n.)
1899 as shortened form of automobile (q.v.). Similar evolution yielded French, German auto.
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auto-focus (n.)

by 1933 in photography, originally of enlargers, by 1942 of lenses, from auto- + focus (n.).

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auto-erotic (adj.)

also autoerotic, 1898, coined by Havelock Ellis from auto- + erotic. Related: Auto-eroticism (1898). The opposite is allo-erotic.

By "auto-erotism" I mean the phenomena of spontaneous sexual emotion generated in the absence of an external stimulus proceeding, directly or indirectly, from another person. [Ellis, "Auto-Erotism," in The Alienist and Neurologist, April 1898]
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automaker (n.)
"manufacturer of automobiles," 1925, from auto "automobile" + maker.
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autocade (n.)
1922, from auto "automobile" + ending from cavalcade.
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autosuggestion (n.)
also auto-suggestion, 1879, a hybrid from auto- + suggestion. The idea, and probably the model for the word, are from French.
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autogamy (n.)
"self-fertilization," 1877, from auto- "self" + -gamy "fertilization." Related: Autogamous (1880).
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autolatry (n.)
"self-worship," 1620s (in Latinate form autolatria), from auto- "self" + -latry "worship of."
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autosome (n.)

"an ordinary (non-sex) chromosome," 1906, coined by U.S. cytologist T.H. Montgomery from auto- + -some (3)). Related: Autosomal.

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auto- 
word-forming element meaning "self, one's own, by oneself, of oneself" (and especially, from 1895, "automobile"), from Greek autos, reflexive pronoun, "self, same," which is of unknown origin. It also was a common word-forming element in ancient Greek, as in modern English, but very few of the old words have survived the interval. In Greek, as a word-forming element, auto- had the sense of "self, one's own, of oneself ('independently'); of itself ('natural, native, not made'); just exactly; together with." Before a vowel, it became aut-; before an aspirate, auth-. In Greek it also was used as a prefix to proper names, as in automelinna "Melinna herself." The opposite prefix would be allo-.
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