Etymology
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attribute (v.)

late 14c., "assign, bestow," from Latin attributus, past participle of attribuere "assign to, allot, commit, entrust;" figuratively "to attribute, ascribe, impute," from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + tribuere "assign, give, bestow" (see tribute). Related: Attributed; attributing.

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attribute (n.)

"quality ascribed to someone, distinguishing mark," especially an excellent or lofty one, late 14c., from Latin attributum "anything attributed," in grammar, "predicate," noun use of neuter of attributus, past participle of attribuere "assign, allot; ascribe, impute" (see attribute (v.)). IT is distinguished from the verb by having stress on the first syllable.

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attributes (n.)

"qualities belonging to someone or something," c. 1600; see attribute (n.).

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attributable (adj.)

"ascribable, imputable," 1660s, from attribute (v.) + -able.

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attributive (adj.)

"pertaining to or having the character of attribution;" in grammar, "pertaining to or expressing an attribute," c. 1600, from French attributif, from stem of Latin attributus (see attribute (v.)). As a noun in grammar, "a word expressing an attribute," from 1750. Related: Attributively; attributiveness.

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ascribe (v.)

mid-14c., ascrive, "attribute, impute, credit" (something to someone), from Old French ascrivre "to inscribe; attribute, impute," from Latin ascribere "to write in, enter in a list; add to in a writing," figuratively "impute, attribute," from ad "to" (see ad-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). The English spelling was conformed to Latin 16c. Related: Ascribed; ascribing.

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adjunct (n.)

1580s, "something added to but not an essential part of (something else)," from Latin adiunctus "closely connected, joined, united" (as a noun, "a characteristic, essential attribute"), past participle of adiungere "join to" (see adjoin).

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omniscience (n.)

"infinite knowledge, the quality or attribute of fully knowing all things," 1610s, from Medieval Latin omniscientia "all-knowledge," from Latin omnis "all" (see omni-) + scientia "knowledge" (see science).

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credit (v.)

1540s, "to believe, be sure of the truth of," from credit (n.). In a looser sense, "to attribute, give as the cause of," 1850. Meaning "to enter upon the credit side of an account" is from 1680s. Related: Credited; crediting.

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connotative (adj.)

1610s, "pertaining to connotation," from Medieval Latin connotativus, from past-participle stem of connotare "to signify in addition to the main meaning;" see connotation. Meaning "implying an attribute while denoting a subject" is from 1829 (J.S. Mill).

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