Etymology
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attend (v.)
c. 1300, "be subject to" (obsolete); early 14c., "direct one's mind or energies" (archaic), from Old French atendre "to expect, wait for, pay attention" (12c., Modern French attendre) and directly from Latin attendere "give heed to," literally "to stretch toward," from ad "to, toward" (see ad-) + tendere "stretch," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch." The notion is of "stretching" one's mind toward something.

Sense of "take care of, wait upon" is from mid-14c.; that of "endeavor to do" is from c. 1400. Meaning "to pay attention" is from early 15c.; that of "accompany and render service to" (someone) is from mid-15c., as is that of "be in attendance." Meaning "to accompany or follow as a consequent" is from 1610s. Related: Attended; attending.
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tend (v.2)
"attend to," c. 1200, a shortening of Middle English atenden (see attend).
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attendant (n.)
"one who waits upon another," early 15c., from the adjective or from French noun use of present participle of atendre (see attend).
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attendant (adj.)
late 14c., "solicitous, attentive," from Old French atendant, present participle of atendre "expect, wait for, pay attention" (see attend (v.)). Sense of "serving under, accompanying in a dependent position" is from c. 1400; that of "closely consequent" is from 1610s.
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unattended (adj.)
c. 1600, "alone, unaccompanied," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of attend (v.). Meaning "with no one in attendance" is from 1796.
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attent (adj.)
late 15c., "attentive," from Latin attentus, past participle of attendere "give heed to" (see attend). As a noun, "intention, aim" (early 13c.), from Old French atente "act of attending," from fem. of Latin attentus.
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attendee (n.)
"one who attends" (something), 1951, from attend + -ee. Attender (mid-15c. as "observer," 1704 as "one who attends") and attendant (1640s as "one present at a public proceeding") are older, but they had overtones of "one who waits upon."
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attentive (adj.)
late 14c., "heedful, observant" (implied in attentively), from Old French atentif "expectant, hopeful," from past-participle stem of Latin attendere "give heed to" (see attend). Sense of "actively ministering to the needs and wants" (of another person) is from early 16c.
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attendance (n.)
late 14c., "act of attending to one's duties" (archaic), from Old French atendance "attention, wait, hope, expectation," from atendant, present participle of atendre "expect, wait for; pay attention" (see attend). Meaning "action of waiting on someone" dates from late 14c. (to dance attendance on someone is from 1560s); that of "action of being present, presenting oneself" (originally with intent of taking a part) is from mid-15c. Meaning "number of persons present" is from 1835. To take attendance in a classroom or lecture is by 1891.
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non-attendance (n.)

also nonattendance, "failure to attend, omission of attendance," 1680s, from non- + attendance.

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