Etymology
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atmospheric (adj.)
1777, "pertaining to or existing in the atmosphere," from atmosphere + -ic. In a sense of "creating a mood or mental environment" it is from 1908. Atmospherics "disturbances in wireless communication" is from 1905.
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meteoric (adj.)

1804, "pertaining to or of the nature of meteors;" earlier "dependent on atmospheric conditions" (1789), from meteor + -ic. Figurative sense of "transiently brilliant" is by 1836.

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steam-engine (n.)
1751; earlier in the same sense was fire-engine (1722), atmospheric engine.
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pneumatics (n.)

"the branch of physics which treats of the mechanical properties of gases, especially of atmospheric air," 1650s, from pneumatic. Also see -ics.

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ambiance (n.)
1923, a reborrowing of the French form of ambience (q.v.), used in art writing as a term meaning "atmospheric effect of an arrangement."
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meteorological (adj.)

1560s, "of or pertaining to atmospheric phenomena," especially "of or pertaining to weather," from French météorologique or directly from a Latinized form of Greek meteōrologikos "pertaining to the earth's atmosphere, from meteōrologia, literally "discussion of high things" (see meteorology). Related: Meteorologically.

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anticyclone (n.)

"outward rotary flow of air from an area of atmospheric high pressure," 1863, coined by Francis Galton, English polymath, explorer, and meteorologist, from anti- + cyclone. Related: Anticyclonic.

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turbulence (n.)
early 15c., from Late Latin turbulentia "trouble, disquiet," from Latin turbulentus (see turbulent). In reference to atmospheric eddies that affect airplanes, by 1918. Related: Turbulency.
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hygrometer (n.)
"instrument for measuring atmospheric moisture," 1660s, from French hygromètre, from Greek hygro- "wet, moist; moisture" (see hygro-) + -meter. Related: Hygrometry; hygrometric.
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fire-damp (n.)
"marsh gas," 1670s, from fire (n.) + damp (n.) "noxious vapor." Largely methane, it can spontaneously ignite when mixed with atmospheric air.
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