Etymology
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exchange (n.)

late 14c., eschaunge, "act of reciprocal giving and receiving," from Anglo-French eschaunge, Old French eschange (Modern French échange), from Late Latin excambium, from excambiare, from Latin ex "out" (see ex-) + cambire "barter" (see change (v.)). The practice of merchants or lenders meeting at certain places to exchange bills of debt led to the meaning "building for mercantile business" (1580s).

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exchange (v.)

late 15c. (Caxton), in commerce, "to part with in return for some equivalent, transfer for a recompense, barter," from Old French eschangier "exchange, barter" (Modern French échanger), from Vulgar Latin *excambiare (source of Italian scambiare); see exchange (n.). Non-commercial sense of "to give and receive reciprocally" is from c. 1600. Related: Exchanged; exchanging.

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asymmetrical (adj.)

"destitute of symmetry, unsymmetrical," 1680s; see asymmetry + -ical. Other forms that have served as an adjective based on asymmetry are asymmetral (1620s), asymmetrous (1660s), and asymmetric (1839); only the last seems to have any general currency. Related: Asymmetrically.

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synallagmatic (adj.)

"expressing reciprocal obligations," from Greek synallagmatikos, from synallagma "a covenant, contract," from syn- "together with" (see syn-) + allagma "thing taken in exchange," from stem of allassein "to exchange, barter," from allos "another," from PIE root *al- "beyond."

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pawn (v.)

"to give or deposit (something) as security" in exchange for the payment of money borrowed, etc., 1560s, from pawn (n.1). Related: Pawned; pawning.

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shoot-out (n.)

1953, "sustained exchange of gunfire;" the expression shoot it out "settle (a conflict, dispute, etc.) by an exchange of gunfire" is from 1912; see shoot (v.) + out (adv.). As a type of sports tie-breaker, by 1978.

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truck (v.1)

"to exchange, barter," early 13c., from Old North French troquer "to barter, exchange," from Medieval Latin trocare "barter," of unknown origin. Rare before 16c. Sense of "have dealings with" is first recorded 1610s. The noun is first recorded 1550s, "act or practice of barter." Sense of "vegetables raised for market" is from 1784, preserved in truck farm (1866).

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NASDAQ 

U.S. stock exchange, founded 1971, an acronym from National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations.

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mutable (adj.)

late 14c., "liable to change," from Latin mutabilis "changeable," from mutare "to change," from PIE root *mei- (1) "to change, go, move," with derivatives referring to the exchange of goods and services as regulated by custom or law (compare Latin mutuus "done in exchange").

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rialto (n.)

"an exchange, a mart," by 1869, a reference to the famous Ponte de Rialto of Venice and the market or exchange that stood on the east end of it and eventually expanded to cover the bridge itself. The name is contracted from Rivoalto and named for the canal (Latin rivus altus "deep stream") which it crosses.

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