Etymology
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asunder (adv.)
"into a position apart, separate, into separate parts," mid-12c., contraction of Old English on sundran (see a- (1) + sunder). Middle English used to know asunder for "distinguish, tell apart."
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intersection (n.)

1550s, "act or fact of crossing," from French intersection (14c.) and directly from Latin intersectionem (nominative intersectio) "a cutting asunder, intersection," noun of action from past-participle stem of intersecare "intersect, cut asunder," from inter- "between" (see inter-) + secare "to cut" (from PIE root *sek- "to cut"). In English originally a term in geometry; meaning "crossroads, a place of crossing" is from 1864. Related: Intersectional.

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riven (adj.)

"split, cloven, burst asunder," c. 1300, past-participle adjective from rive "to tear, rend."

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disruption (n.)

"a rending asunder, a bursting apart, forcible separation into parts," early 15c., originally medical, "laceration of tissue," general sense from 1640s, from Medieval Latin disruptionem (nominative disruptio) "a breaking asunder," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin disrumpere "break apart, split, shatter, break to pieces," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + rumpere "to break," from PIE root *runp- "to break" (see corrupt (adj.)).

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intersect (v.)
1610s (trans.), back-formation from intersection, or else from Latin intersectus, past participle of intersecare "intersect, cut asunder," from inter "between" (see inter-) + secare "to cut" (from PIE root *sek- "to cut"). Intransitive sense is from 1847. Related: Intersected; intersecting.
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scission (n.)
"act of cutting or dividing," mid-15c., from French scission (14c.), from Late Latin scissionem (nominative scissio) "a cleaving, dividing," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin scindere "to cut, rend, tear asunder, split; split up, part, divide, separate," from PIE *skind-, from root *skei- "to cut, split."
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disunite (v.)

1560s "to separate, cause to be disjoined" (implied in disunited); see dis- + unite. Possibly from Late Latin disunitus, past participle of disunire. Intransitive meaning "to part, fall asunder, become divided" is from 1670s. Related: Disuniting.

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dissever (v.)

late 13c., disseveren, "divide asunder, separate," from Anglo-French deseverer, Old French dessevrer (10c.), from des- "apart" (see dis-) + sevrer (see sever). Intransitive sense of "to part" is from early 15c. Related: Dissevered; dissevering; disseverment; disseveration.

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rive (v.)

"tear in pieces, strike asunder," c. 1200, from a Scandinavian or North Sea Germanic source akin to Old Norse rifa "to tear apart," from Proto-Germanic *rifanan "to tear, scratch" (compare Swedish rifva, Danish rive "scratch, tear"), from PIE root *rei- "to scratch, tear, cut" (see riparian).

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di- (2)

word-forming element of Latin origin meaning "apart, asunder," the form of dis- before certain voiced consonants. As des- was a form of dis- in Old French, some Middle English words have forms in both de- and di-; compare devise, which really belongs to di- and is related to divide.

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