Etymology
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iffy (adj.)
1937, American English, from if + -y (2). Originally associated with President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
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psychedelia (n.)

"the subculture associated with users of psychedelic drugs; psychedelic phenomena collectively," 1967, from psychedelic + -ia.

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combative (adj.)

"pugnacious, disposed to fight," 1819, from combat (v.) + -ive. In 1820s-30s, much associated with phrenology. Related: Combatively; combativeness (1815).

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bebop (n.)
1944, from bebop, rebop, bop, nonsense words in jazz lyrics, attested from at least 1928. The style is associated with Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie.
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sing-along 
1959, noun and adjective, from verbal phrase; see sing (v.) + along (adv.). Originally associated with U.S. music producer Mitch Miller (1911-2010).
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associate (v.)
mid-15c., "join in company, combine intimately" (transitive), from Latin associatus past participle of associare "join with," from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + sociare "unite with," from socius "companion, ally," from PIE *sokw-yo-, suffixed form of root *sekw- (1) "to follow." Related: Associated; associating. Intransitive sense of "have intercourse, be associated" is from 1640s. Earlier form of the verb was associen (late 14c.), from Old French associier "associate (with)."
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anti-hero (n.)

also antihero; 1714, "opposite of a hero, a villain," from anti- + hero. Sense of "a literary hero who lacks the usual qualities associated with a literary hero" is by 1859.

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pre-eclampsia (n.)

also preeclampsia, "pregnancy condition characterized by high blood pressure and other symptoms associated with eclampsia," 1903, from pre- + eclampsia. Related: Pre-eclamptic (1896).

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Ljubljana 
capital of Slovenia, the name is popularly associated with the Slavic word ljub "dear," but it is probably pre-Slavic and of obscure origin. The German form, Laibach, is from the Roman name, Labacum.
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tipsy (adj.)
1570s, from tip (v.1); compare drowsy, flimsy, tricksy. Later associated with tipple. Tipsy-cake (1806) was stale cake saturated with wine or liquor.
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