Etymology
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self-esteem (n.)
1650s, from self- + esteem (n.). Popularized by phrenology, which assigned it a "bump" (Spurzheim, 1815).
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allowed (adj.)
late 14c., "praised;" mid-15c., "assigned as a due share;" late 15c., "permitted," past-participle adjective from allow.
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cantonment (n.)
1756, "military quarters, part of a town assigned to a particular regiment," from French cantonnement, from cantonner "to divide into cantons" (14c.), from canton "angle, corner" (see canton). Meaning "action of quartering troops" is from 1757.
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overdue (adj.)

"delayed or withheld beyond the usual or assigned time," 1845 of unpaid bills, 1890 of unreturned library books, 1970 of menstruation, from over- + due (adj.).

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Bunker Hill 
battle site in Massachusetts, U.S., it rises on land assigned in 1634 to George Bunker, who came from the vicinity of Bedford, England. The name dates from 1229, as Bonquer, and is from Old French bon quer "good heart."
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understudy (v.)
also under-study, 1852, in the theatrical sense "memorize a part so as to be capable of performing on short notice it in the absence of the one to which it is assigned," from under + study (v.). The noun is attested from 1848, translating Italian supplimento.
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parachronism (n.)

"error in chronology by which an event has assigned to it a date later than the proper one," 1640s, from para- "beside, beyond" + Latinized form of Greek khronos "time" (see chrono-) + -ism

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assignment (n.)
late 14c., "an order, request, directive," from Old French assignement "(legal) assignment (of dower, etc.)," from Late Latin assignamentum, noun of action from Latin assignare/adsignare "to allot, assign, award" (see assign). Meaning "appointment to office" is mid-15c.; that of "a task assigned (to someone), commission" is by 1848.
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allotment (n.)
1570s, "action of allotting," from French allotement, from Old French aloter "divide by lots" (see allot). Or else a native formation from allot + -ment. Meaning "that which is allotted, portion assigned to someone or some purpose" is from 1670s.
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colors (n.)

"flag of a regiment or ship" 1580s, from color (n.). Hence color-guard (1820), originally the soldiers assigned to guard the colors of the regiment, color-bearer(1855), the one who carries the regimental flag, and to do something with flying colors "successfully" (1690s).

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