Etymology
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Asclepius 
Latinized form of Greek Asklepios, which is of unknown origin. Beekes writes that "The name is typical for Pre-Greek words ...." Originally a Thessalian prince famous as a physician, later regarded as a son of Apollo and god of medicine.
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Asherah (n.)
wooden pillar used as symbol of Canaanite goddess Ashera, 1839, a name of unknown origin.
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Asiatic (adj.)
"belonging to or characteristic of Asia," 1630s, from Latin Asiaticus (surname of general Lucius Cornelius Scipio), from Greek Asiatikos, from Asia (see Asia; also compare Asian). As a noun, "native or inhabitant of Asia," by 1763. In ancient Rome, Asiatici oratores was florid and overly ornate prose.
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Ashkenazim (n.)
(plural) "central and northern European Jews" (as opposed to Sephardim, the Jews of Spain and Portugal), 1839, from Hebrew Ashkenazzim, plural of Ashkenaz, eldest son of Gomer (Genesis x.3), also the name of a nation mentioned in Jeremiah li.27. Perhaps the people-name is akin to Greek skythoi "Scythians" (compare Akkadian ishkuzai), altered by folk etymology. They were identified historically with various peoples; in the Middle Ages especially with the Germans, hence the word came to be used for "Jews of Germany and Poland," who far outnumbered the Sephardim and differed from them in pronunciation of Hebrew and in customs but not in doctrine. Related: Ashkenazic.
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Assyria 
Middle English, from Latin Assyria, from Greek Assyria, short for Assyria ge "the Assyrian land," from fem. of Assyrios "pertaining to Assyria," from Akkadian Ashshur, name of the chief city of the kingdom and also of a god, probably from Assyrian sar "prince." Compare Syria. Related: Assyrian.
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Asperger's Syndrome (n.)

1981, named for the sake of Austrian pediatrician Hans Asperger (1906-1980), who described it in 1944 (and called it autistic psychopathy; German autistischen psychopathen). A standard diagnosis since 1992; recognition of Asperger's work was delayed, perhaps, because his school and much of his early research were destroyed by Allied bombing in 1944.

The example of autism shows particularly well how even abnormal personalities can be capable of development and adjustment. Possibilities of social integration which one would never have dremt of may arise in the course of development. [Hans Asperger, "Autistic psychopathy in Childhood," 1944]
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Ashley 
fem. proper name, all but unknown before c. 1965; one of the most popular names for girls born in U.S. from c. 1980; evidently inspired by the surname Ashley, Ashleigh (attested from 12c.), which means "clearing among the ash trees," from Old English æsc (see ash (n.2)) + leah (see lea).
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Ashanti (n.)
also Ashantee, 1705, Asiantines, one of the Akan people of central Ghana; a native name. The language, part of the Niger-Congo family, is so called by 1874.
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Aspasia 
beautiful and capable Milesian consort of Pericles; her name is from fem. of Greek aspasios "welcome," related to aspazesthai "to welcome," which is of uncertain origin.
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Asiago 
type of Italian cheese, by 1922, named for town of Asiago (German Schlägen) in the Veneto region of Italy.
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