Etymology
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arrangement (n.)
"act of arraigning, act of putting in proper order," 1740, from French arrangement (Old French arengement), from arranger "arrange" (see arrange). Meaning "that which is put in order, combination of parts or materials" is from 1800. Sense in music is from 1813. Meaning "final settlement, adjustment by agreement" is from 1855.
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pre-arrangement (n.)

also prearrangement, "previous arrangement," 1775, from pre- + arrangement.

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biotaxy (n.)
"classification and arrangement of living organisms according to their characteristics," 1853, from bio- "life" + -taxy, from Greek taxis "arrangement" (see tactics).
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frillery (n.)
"frills collectively; a frilly arrangement," 1842, from frill (n.) + -ery. Related: Frilleries.
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chiasmus (n.)

in grammar, "the arrangement of repeated, parallel, or contrasted words or phrases in pairs with inversion of word order," 1850, Latinized from Greek khiasmos "a placing crosswise, diagonal arrangement" (see chi).

Adam, first of men,
To first of women, Eve.
["Paradise Lost"]
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taxeme (n.)
1933, from Greek taxis "order, arrangement" (see tactics) + -eme.
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tactics (n.)
1620s, "science of arranging military forces for combat," from Modern Latin tactica (17c.), from Greek taktike techne "art of arrangement," noun use of fem. of taktikos "of or pertaining to arrangement," especially "tactics in war," adjective to taxis "arrangement, an arranging, the order or disposition of an army, battle array; order, regularity," verbal noun of tassein "arrange," from PIE root *tag- "to touch, handle."
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tessellation (n.)
"minute arrangement of parts or colors," 1650s, noun of action from Late Latin tessellatus (see tessellated).
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nervation (n.)

"arrangement or distribution of nerves," especially in the blades of leaves, 1849; see nerve (n.) + -ation.

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tactic (n.)

1766, from Modern Latin tactica, from Greek taktikē (tekhnē) "(art of) arrangement," from fem. of taktikos "pertaining to arrangement" (see tactics). Earlier it meant "a tactician" (1630s), and was in use as an adjective meaning "tactical" (c. 1600).

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