Etymology
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Arminian (adj.)

1610s in reference to a Protestant sect, from Arminius, the Latinized form of the name of James Harmensen (1560-1609), Dutch Protestant theologian who opposed Calvin, especially on the question of predestination. His ideas were denounced at the Synod of Dort, but nonetheless spread in the Reformed churches. As a noun from 1610s. Related: Arminianism.

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Armorica 

ancient name for Brittany, from Gallo-Roman Aremorica, literally "before the sea," with a Celtic prefix meaning "before" (compare Old Irish ar) + mare "sea" (from PIE root *mori- "body of water").

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Armageddon (n.)

"cataclysmic final conflict," 1811, figurative use of the place-name in Revelation xvi.16, the site of the great and final conflict, from Hebrew Har Megiddon "Mount of Megiddo," a city in central Palestine, site of important Israelite battles.

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Armenia 

late 14c., a place-name traced to 521 C.E., of uncertain origin. Armenian is from 1590s as "a native of Armenia;" as the name of the Indo-European language spoken there, by 1718; as an adjective, by 1727.

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