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architecture (n.)

1560s, "the art of building, tasteful application of scientific and traditional rules of good construction to the materials at hand," from French architecture, from Latin architectura, from architectus "master builder, chief workman" (see architect). Meaning "buildings constructed architecturally" is from 1610s.

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architectural (adj.)
1759; see architecture + -al (1). Related: Architecturally.
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entablature (n.)
1610s, in architecture, nativization of Italian intavolatura; see en- (1) + tablature.
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suborder (n.)
also sub-order, 1807 in biology; 1834 in architecture, from sub- + order (n.). Related: Subordinal.
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necking (n.)

"embracing and caressing a member of the opposite sex," 1825; see neck (v.). In architecture, "moldings near the capital of a column."

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torus (n.)
1560s, in architecture, "large, rounded molding at the base of a column," from Latin torus "a swelling, bulge, knot; cushion, couch."
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ogee (n.)

in architecture, "an S-shaped molding," 1670s, said to be from a corruption of French ogive "diagonal rib of a vault" of a type normal in 13c. French architecture, earlier augive, a word of unknown origin. According to Watkins, in part from Latin via "way, road" (see via). Related: ogival. Middle English had ogif (late 13c.) "a stone for the diagonal rib of a vault," from the French word and Medieval Latin ogiva.

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functionalism (n.)
1892, "functionality;" 1902 as a term in social sciences; from functional + -ism. In architecture from 1930. Related: functionalist.
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hipped (adj.)
"having hips," c. 1500, past-participle adjective; see hip (n.1)). In architecture (of roofs) from 1785.
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caulis (n.)

in architecture, "one of the main stalks on the second row of a Corinthian capital," 1560s, from Latin caulis "stem or stalk of a plant" (see cole (n.1)). The literal sense in English is from 1870.

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