Etymology
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sociology (n.)

the science of social phenomena, 1842, from French sociologie, a hybrid coined 1830 by French philosopher Isidore Auguste Comte (1798-1857), from Latin socius "associate" (see social (adj.)) + Greek-derived suffix -logie (see -logy).

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applied (adj.)

"put to practical use," (as opposed to abstract or theoretical), 1650s, from past participle of apply. Earlier it was used in a sense of "folded" (c. 1500).

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sociological (adj.)

1861; see sociology + -ical. Related: Sociologically.

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matrifocal (adj.)

1952, in reference to families or households where the mother has responsibility and authority, a term from sociology, from matri- + focal.

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dysfunction (n.)

"failure to function, abnormality or impairment of function," 1914, from dys- "bad, abnormal, difficult" + function (n.). Originally in anatomy and medicine; in sociology by 1949.

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stratification (n.)

1610s, from Medieval Latin stratificationem (nominative stratificatio), noun of action from past participle stem of stratificare "to form strata," from stratum "thing spread out" (see stratum) + combining form of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). In sociology from 1879.

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socio- 

word-forming element meaning "social, of society; social and," also "having to do with sociology," from combining form of Latin socius "companion, ally, associate, fellow, sharer," from PIE *sokw-yo-, suffixed form of root *sekw- (1) "to follow." Common in compounds since c. 1880.

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sensate (adj.)

mid-15c., sensat, "endowed with sense; capable of sensation," from Late Latin sensatus "gifted with sense," from sensus "perception, feeling, undertaking, meaning" (see sense (n.)). By 1847 as "perceived by the senses." From 1937 in sociology.

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mum (n.2)

pet word for "mother," 1823, short for mummy (see mamma). In British sociology, used from 1957 in reference to "the working class mother as an influence in the lives of her children." Also sometimes a vulgar corruption of madam or ma'am.

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