Etymology
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anything (n.)
"a thing," indefinitely, late Old English aniþing, from any + thing. But Old English ænig þinga apparently also meant "somehow, anyhow" (glossing Latin quoquo modo).
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anythingarian (n.)
"one indifferent to religious creeds, one 'that always make their interest the standard of their religion,'" 1704, originally dismissive, from anything on model of trinitarian, unitarian, etc.
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brickette (n.)
"small brick" of anything, 1924; see briquette.
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jot (n.)
"the least part of anything," 1520s, from Latin iota, from Greek iota "the letter -i-," the smallest letter in the Greek alphabet, also "the least part of anything" (see iota). Usually (and originally) with tittle, from Matthew v.18.
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exoticism (n.)

"state of being exotic; anything exotic," 1827, from exotic + -ism.

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evil (n.)

"anything that causes injury, anything that harms or is likely to harm; a malady or disease; conduct contrary to standards of morals or righteousness," Old English yfel (see evil (adj.)).

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addressee (n.)
"one to whom anything is addressed," 1810; see address (v.) + -ee.
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topper (n.)
"the best (of anything)," 1709, originally slang, agent noun from top (v.).
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closer (n.)

"one who or that which closes" anything, 1610s, agent noun from close (v.).

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aught (n.1)

"something, anything," late 12c., from Old English awiht "aught, anything, something," literally "e'er a whit," from a- "ever" (from Proto-Germanic *aiwi- "ever," extended form of PIE root *aiw- "vital force, life; long life, eternity") + *wihti "thing, anything whatever" (see wight). In Shakespeare, Milton, and Pope, aught and ought occur indiscriminately. Chaucer used aughtwhere (adv.) "anywhere."

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