Etymology
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apanthropy (n.)

"aversion to human company, love of solitude," 1753, nativized form of Greek apanthropia, abstract noun from apanthropos "unsocial," from assimilated form of apo "off, away from" (see apo-) + anthrōpos "man, human" (see anthropo-). Related: Apanthropic.

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anthropic (adj.)

"pertaining to a human being," 1836, from Greek anthrōpikos "human; of or for a man," from anthrōpos "male human being, man" (see anthropo-). Related: Anthropical (1804).

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zoanthropy (n.)

form of insanity in which a man imagines himself to be another type of beast, 1845, from French zoanthrope or directly from Modern Latin zoanthropia, from Greek zoion "animal" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live") + anthrōpos "man" (see anthropo-).

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anthropophagous (adj.)

"cannibalistic, man-eating," 1807, from Greek anthrōpophagos "man-eating," from anthrōpos "man, human" (see anthropo-) + phagos "eating" (from PIE root *bhag- "to share out, apportion; to get a share"). Related: Anthropophagite (c. 1600).

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psilanthropism (n.)

"the teaching or doctrine that Jesus was entirely human," 1817 (Coleridge; "Biographia Literaria"), from Greek psilanthrōpos "merely human," from psilos "naked, bare, mere" (see psilo-) + anthrōpos "man" (see anthropo-). Related: Psilanthropy; psilanthropic; psilanthropist.

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cynanthropy (n.)

"form of madness in which the afflicted imagines himself to be a dog," 1590s, from Latinized form of Greek kynanthropos "of a dog-man,"  from kyōn (genitive kynos) "dog" (from PIE root *kwon- "dog") + anthrōpos "male human being, man" (see anthropo-).

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anthropomorphous (adj.)

"having human form; anthropoid in form" (of apes, etc.), 1753, Englishing of Late Latin anthropomorphus "having human form," from Greek anthropomorphos "of human form," from anthrōpos "human being" (see anthropo-) + morphē "form," a word of uncertain etymology. Related: Anthropomorphously.

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misanthrope (n.)

"one who hates humankind, one who distrusts human character or motives," 1560s, from Greek misanthrōpos "hating mankind," from misein "to hate" (see miso-) + anthrōpos "man" (from PIE root *ner- (2) "man"). Alternative form misanthropist is attested from 1650s.

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anthropopathy (n.)

"ascription of human feelings to divine beings," 1640s, from Greek anthrōpopatheia "humanity," literally "human feeling," from anthrōpos "man, human" (see anthropo-) + -patheia, combining form of pathos "suffering, disease, feeling" (from PIE root *kwent(h)- "to suffer"). Related: Anthropopathic; anthropopathite; anthropopathically.

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anthropolatry (n.)

"worship of a human being," 1650s, from Greek anthrōpos "man, human" (see anthropo-) + latreia "hired labor, service, worship" (see -latry). The accusation was made by pagans against Christians and by Christians against pagans. The word figured in Church disputes about the nature of Christ.

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