Etymology
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labial (adj.)
"pertaining to the lips," 1590s, from Medieval Latin labialis "having to do with the lips," from Latin labium "lip" (see lip (n.)). The noun meaning "a labial sound" (one accomplished by complete closure of the lips) is from 1660s, from the adjective in this sense (1590s). Related: Labially.
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anterior (adj.)
"more in front; earlier," 1610s, Latin, literally "former," comparative of ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before"). Related: Anteriorly (1590s); anteriority.
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labialize (v.)
1856, from labial + -ize. Related: Labialized; labializing.
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venous (adj.)
1620s, from Latin venosus "full of veins," from vena (see vein).
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preconscious (adj.)

"pertaining to or involving a state anterior to consciousness," 1860, from pre- "before" + conscious (adj.).

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protero- 
before vowels proter-, word-forming element meaning "former, earlier," from Greek proteros "before, former, anterior," from PIE *pro-, from root *per- (1) "forward" (hence "before, first").
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venation (n.)
"arrangement of veins," 1640s, of plant structures, noun of state from Latin vena "vein" (see vein). Related: Venational.
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angiogram (n.)

"X-ray image of the arteries, veins, and/or heart chambers," 1933, from angio- + -gram.

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bilabial (adj.)
1857, "having or appearing to have two lips;" see bi- "two" + labial. In linguistics, of consonants pronounced with both lips, 1878. Alternative bilabiate is attested from 1794.
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blue-blood (adj.)
1809 in reference to the blood that flows in the veins of the old and aristocratic families of Spain, translating Spanish sangre azul, claimed by certain families of Castile that held themselves uncontaminated by Moorish or Jewish admixture; the term probably is from the notion of the visible veins of people of fair complexion. In reference to English families by 1827. As a noun, "member of an old and aristocratic family," by 1877. See blue (adj.1) + blood (n.).
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