Etymology
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antelope (n.)

early 15c., from Old French antelop, from Medieval Latin antalopus, anthalopus (11c.), from Late Greek antholops (Eusebius of Antioch, c. 336 C.E.), in reference to a fabulous animal haunting the banks of the Euphrates, very savage, hard to catch and having long saw-like horns capable of cutting down trees. In modern zoology, the name was applied c. 1600 to a living type of deer-like mammal of India. In the western U.S., the name is used in reference to the pronghorn.

The word's original sense and language are unknown (it looks like Greek "flower-eye," as if from anthos + ops, but that may be Greek folk etymology). The creature figures in heraldry, and also was known in Medieval Latin as talopus and calopus.

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kudu (n.)
South African antelope, 1777, from Kaffir (Xhosa) iqhude.
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reebok (n.)
South African antelope, 1775, from Dutch form of roebuck.
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izard (n.)
chamois-like antelope of the Pyrenees, 1791, from French isard, Gascon isart, "perhaps of Iberian origin" (according to French sources), or [Klein] from Basque (which has izzara "star").
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springbok (n.)
South African gazelle, 1775, from Afrikaans, from springen "to leap" (from Middle Dutch springhen, see spring (v.)) + bok "antelope," from Middle Dutch boc (see buck (n.1)).
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gnu (n.)
ox-like South African antelope, 1777, gnoo, from Dutch gnoe, used by German traveler Georg Forster (1754-1794) to render Khoisan (Hottentot) i-ngu "wildebeest," from Southern Bushman !nu: (in which ! and : represent clicks).
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hartebeest (n.)
1781, from Afrikaans, from Dutch hertebeest "antelope," from hert "hart" (see hart) + beest "beast, ox" (in South African Dutch "steer, cattle"), from Middle Dutch beeste, from Old French beste "beast" (see beast).
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chamois (n.)

1550s, "Alpine antelope;" 1570s, "soft leather," originally "skin of the chamois," from French chamois "Alpine antelope" (14c.), from Late Latin camox (genitive camocis), perhaps from a pre-Latin Alpine language that also produced Italian camoscio, Spanish camuza, Old High German gamiza, German Gemse (though some of these might be from Latin camox). As a verb, "to polish with chamois," from 1934. Compare shammy.

Its size is about that of a well-grown goat, and it is so agile that it can clear at a bound crevices 16 or 18 feet wide. The chamois is one of the most wary of antelopes, and possesses the power of scenting man at an almost incredible distance, so that the hunting of it is an occupation of extreme difficulty and much danger. [Century Dictionary]
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eland (n.)
Cape elk, large South African antelope, 1786, from Dutch eland "elk," probably from a Baltic source akin to Lithuanian elnias "deer," from PIE *el- (2) "red, brown" (see elk), cognate with first element in Greek Elaphebolion, name of the ninth month of the Attic year (corresponding to late March-early April), literally "deer-hunting (month)." Borrowed earlier in English as ellan (1610s, via French), ellend (from the German form of the word).
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prong (n.)

early 15c., prange "sharp point or pointed instrument;" mid-15c., pronge "agony, pain," from Anglo-Latin pronga "prong, pointed tool," of unknown origin, perhaps related to Middle Low German prange "stick, restraining device," prangen "to press, pinch." See also prod, which might be related. The sense of "each pointed division of a fork" is by 1690s. Prong-horned antelope is from 1815 (short form pronghorn attested from 1826).

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