Etymology
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Anthony 

masc. proper name, from Latin Antonius, name of a Roman gens (with an unetymological -h- probably suggested by many Greek loan words beginning anth-, such as anthros "flower," anthropos "man").

St. Anthony (4c.), Egyptian hermit, was patron saint of swineherds, to whom one of each litter was usually vowed, hence Anthony for "smallest pig of the litter (1660s; in condensed form tantony pig from 1590s). St. Anthony's Fire (1520s), popular name for erysipelas, is said to be so called from the tradition that those who sought his intercession recovered from that distemper during a fatal epidemic in 1089.

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Antioch 
ancient city, modern Antakya in Turkey, anciently the capital of Syria, founded c. 300 B.C.E. by Seleucus I Nictor and named for his father, Antiochus. The name, also borne by several Syrian kings and an eclectic philosopher, is a Latinized form of Greek Antiokhos, literally "resistant, holding out against," from anti "against" (see anti-) + ekhein "to have, hold;" in intransitive use, "be in a given state or condition" (from PIE root *segh- "to hold"). Related: Antiochian.
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Antigua 
Caribbean island, from Spanish fem. of antiguo, literally "ancient, antique" (see antique); discovered by Columbus in 1493 and named by him for the church of Santa Maria la Antigua ("Old St. Mary's") in Seville. Related: Antiguan.
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Antony 
masc. proper name, from Latin Antonius, name of a Roman gens (see Anthony).
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Antigone 
daughter of Oedipus, her name in Greek might mean "in place of a mother," from anti "opposite, in place of" (see anti-) + gone "womb, childbirth, generation," from root of gignesthai "to be born" related to genos "race, birth, descent" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups).
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Antonia 
fem. proper name, from Latin Antonia, fem. of Antonius (see Anthony).
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Antietam 
place name, eastern U.S., from an Algonquian word perhaps meaning "swift water;" the name occurrs in Pennsylvania and Ohio, but the best-known is a creek near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland; site of a bloody American Civil War battle fought Sept. 17, 1862.
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Antonine (adj.)
1680s, in reference to Roman emperors Antoninus Pius (ruled 138-161 C.E.) and Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (161-180). For the name, see Anthony. Earlier (1540s) of the followers of St. Anthony of Egypt; later Antonian (1904) was used in this sense.
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Antarctica 

continent name attributed to Scottish cartographer John George Bartholomew, who used it on a map published in 1887. From antarctic (q.v.). Hypothetical southern continents had been imagined since antiquity; first sighting of Antarctica by Europeans probably was 1820 (Lazarev and Bellingshausen). Also compare antipodes.

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