Etymology
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ant (n.)

c. 1500 shortening of Middle English ampte (late 14c.), from Old English æmette "ant," from West Germanic *emaitjon (source also of Old High German ameiza, German Ameise) from a compound of Germanic *e-, *ai- "off, away" + *mai- "cut," from PIE root *mai- (1) "to cut" (see maim). Thus the insect's name is, etymologically, "the biter-off."

As þycke as ameten crepeþ in an amete hulle [chronicle of Robert of Gloucester, 1297]

Emmet survived into 20c. as an alternative form. By a similar contraction, aunt "a parent's sister" is from Latin amita. White ant "termite" is from 1729. To have ants in one's pants "be nervous and fidgety" is from 1934, made current by a popular song; antsy embodies the same notion.

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ant-hill (n.)
also anthill, "mound of dirt formed by ants in building their nest," late 13c., from ant + hill (n.).
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fire-ant (n.)
1796, from fire (n.) + ant. So called for their bite.
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ant-eater (n.)
also anteater, 1764, in reference to the South American species; 1868 of the Australian echidna; from ant + agent noun from eat (v.).
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suppressant (n.)
"that which suppresses," 1922, from suppress + -ant.
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colorant (n.)

"pigment, coloring material," 1884, from French colorant; see color + -ant.

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depressant (n.)

"a sedative," 1876; see depress + -ant. From 1887 as an adjective, "having the quality of depressing."

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recombinant (adj.)

"formed by recombination," 1942, from recombine + -ant.

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