Etymology
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announcement (n.)
1798, from French announcement, from Old French anoncier "announce, proclaim" (see announce). Or else formed in English from announce + -ment. Earlier in same sense was announcing.
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pronouncement (n.)

"act of pronouncing; a proclamation or formal announcement," 1590s, from pronounce + -ment.

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aubade (n.)
"song to be performed in open air in the early morning, musical announcement of dawn," 1670s, from French aubade "dawn" (15c.), from Provençal aubada, from auba "dawn," from Latin alba, fem. of albus "white" (see alb).
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handbill (n.)
loose paper circulated by hand to make a public announcement, 1753, from hand (n.) + bill (n.1). Also applied to posted bills.
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annunciation (n.)

early 14c., "Lady-day, Church festival commemorating announcement of the incarnation of Christ," from Anglo-French anunciacioun, Old French anonciacion "announcement, news; Feast of the Annunciation," from Latin annuntiationem (nominative annuntiatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of annuntiare "announce, relate" (see announce).

General sense of "an announcing" is from 1560s. The Church festival (March 25) commemorates the visit of the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary, foretelling the incarnation. Old English for "Annunciation Day" was bodungdæg.

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billing (n.1)
1875, "announcement on a bill or poster," verbal noun from bill (v.) "post as a public notice" (see bill (n.1)); hence top billing (1928). Meaning "act of sending out a bill" is recorded from 1908.
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promulgation (n.)

"publication, open declaration," c. 1600, from French promulgation (14c.), from Latin promulgationem (nominative promulgatio) "a public announcement," noun of action from past-participle stem of promulgare "make publicly known" (see promulgate).

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proclaim (v.)

"make known by public announcement, promulgate," especially by herald or crier, late 14c., proclamen, from Latin proclamare "cry or call out," from pro "forth" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward") + clamare "to cry out" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout"). Spelling altered by influence of claim. Related: Proclaimed; proclaiming; proclaimer.

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communique (n.)

"an official announcement or report," 1852, from French communiqué, originally past participle of communiquer "to communicate" (14c.), from Latin communicare "impart, inform" (see communication). Originally the heading of official statements from the French government. Fowler says better, if it must be used in English, to print it with the accent.

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intimation (n.)

mid-15c., "action of making known," from Old French intimation (14c.), from Late Latin intimationem (nominative intimatio) "an announcement," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin intimare "make known, announce, impress" (see intimate (adj.)). Meaning "action of expressing by suggestion or hint, indirect imparting of information" is from 1530s.

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