Etymology
Advertisement
animus (n.)
1820, "temper" (usually in a hostile sense), from Latin animus "rational soul, mind, life, mental powers, consciousness, sensibility; courage, desire," related to anima "living being, soul, mind, disposition, passion, courage, anger, spirit, feeling," from PIE root *ane- "to breathe."

It has no plural. As a term in Jungian psychology for the masculine component of a feminine personality, it dates from 1923. For sense development in Latin, compare Old Norse andi "breath, breathing; current of air; aspiration in speech; soul, spirit, spiritual being."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
longanimity (n.)
"patience," mid-15c., from Late Latin longanimitas, from longanimus "long-suffering, patient," from longus "long, extended" (see long (adj.)) + animus "soul, spirit, mind" (see animus).
Related entries & more 
unanimous (adj.)
1610s, from Latin unanimus "of one mind, in union," from unus "one" (from PIE root *oi-no- "one, unique") + animus "mind, spirit" (see animus). Related: Unanimously.
Related entries & more 
anima (n.)
Jung's term for the inner part of the personality, or the female component of a masculine personality, 1923, from fem. of Latin animus "the rational soul; life; the mental powers, intelligence" (see animus). For earlier use in the sense "soul, vital principle," see anima mundi.
Related entries & more 
magnanimous (adj.)

1580s, "nobly brave or valiant," from magnanimity + -ous, or else from Latin magnanimus "highminded," literally "great-souled," from magnus "great" (from PIE root *meg- "great") + animus "mind, soul, spirit" (see animus). From 1590s as "elevated in soul or sentiment, superior to petty resentments." Related: Magnanimously.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
pusillanimous (adj.)

early 15c., pusillanimus, "timid, lacking strength and firmness of mind," from Late Latin pusillanimis "having little courage" (used in Church Latin to translate Greek oligopsykhos "small-souled"), from Latin pusillis "very weak, little" (diminutive of pullus "young animal," from PIE root *pau- (1) "few, little") + animus "spirit, courage" (see animus). Related: Pusillanimously; pusillanimousness.

Related entries & more 
ame damnee (n.)
"devoted adherent, toady," from French âme damnée "familiar spirit," literally "damned soul," originally a soul damned by compact with a controlling demon. French âme"soul" (Old French anme, 9c.) is from Latin anima (see animus); for damnée see damn.
Related entries & more 
anima mundi (n.)
"spiritual essence, distinct from matter and supposed in the philosophy of Pythagoras and Plato to be diffused throughout the universe, organizing and acting through the whole of it," 1670s, Medieval Latin, literally "soul of the world;" used by Abelard to render Greek psyche tou kosmou. From fem. of Latin animus "the rational soul; life; the mental powers, intelligence" (see animus) + genitive of mundus "universe, world" (see mundane).
Related entries & more 
animadvert (v.)
early 15c., "to take notice of," from Latin animadvertere "to notice, take cognizance of," also "to censure, blame, punish," literally "turn the mind to," from animus "the mind" (see animus) + advertere "turn to" (see advertise). Sense of "to criticize, blame, censure" in English is from 1660s. Related: Animadverted; animadverting.
Related entries & more 
equanimity (n.)
c. 1600, "fairness, impartiality," from French équanimité, from Latin aequanimitatem (nominative aequanimitas) "evenness of mind, calmness; good-will, kindness," from aequanimis "mild, kind," literally "even-minded," from aequus "even, level" (see equal (adj.)) + animus "mind, spirit" (see animus). Meaning "evenness of temper" in English is from 1610s.
Related entries & more