Etymology
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animate (v.)

1530s, "to fill with boldness or courage," from Latin animatus past participle of animare "give breath to," also "to endow with a particular spirit, to give courage to, enliven," from anima "life, breath" (from PIE root *ane- "to breathe").

The sense of "give natural life to" in English is attested from 1742. The meaning "render in moving pictures" is by 1888 (animated pictures); in reference to cinematic cartoons by 1911. Related: Animated; animating.

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animate (adj.)

"alive," late 14c., animat, from Latin animatus, past participle of animare "give breath to," also "to endow with a particular spirit, to give courage to, enliven," from anima "life, breath" (from PIE root *ane- "to breathe").

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animator (n.)

1630s, "one who or that which enlivens or inspires," from Latin animator, agent noun from animare (see animate (v.)). Cinematographic sense of "artist who makes drawings for cinematographic cartoons" is by 1919.

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reanimate (v.)

also re-animate, "restore to life, make alive again, revive, resuscitate," 1610s, in both spiritual and physical senses, from re- "back, again" + animate (v.) "endow with life." Sense of "revive when dull or languid" is by 1762. Related: Reanimated; reanimating.

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exanimate (adj.)

"inanimate, lifeless," 1530s, from Latin exanimatus "lifeless, dead," past participle of exanimare "to deprive of air or breath; tire, fatigue; to deprive of life; to terrify," from ex "out" (see ex-) + animare "give breath to" (see animate (v.)). Related: Exanimation.

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animated (adj.)

1530s, "alive," past-participle adjective from animate (v.). The meaning "mentally excited, lively" is from 1530s, that of "full of activity" is from 1580s. The moving pictures sense is attested from 1890. Related: Animatedly.

At present [Edison] is working at the 'Kinetograph,' a combination of the phonograph and the instantaneous photograph as exhibited in the zoetrope, by which he expects to produce an animated picture or simulacrum of a scene in real life or the drama, with its appropriate words and sounds. [J. Munro, "Heroes of the Telegraph," 1890]
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vegetate (v.)

c. 1600, "to grow as plants do," perhaps a back-formation from vegetation, or from Latin vegetatus, past participle of vegetare "to enliven, to animate" (see vegetable (adj.)). Sense of "to lead a dull, empty, or stagnant life" is from 1740. Related: Vegetated; vegetating.

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embody (v.)

1540s, in reference to a soul or spirit, "invest with an animate form;" from 1660s of principles, ideas, etc., "express, arrange or exemplify intelligently or perceptibly;" from em- (1) "in" + body (n.). Related: Embodied; embodying.

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informative (adj.)

1650s, "instructive, didactic," from Medieval Latin informativus, from Latin informatus, past participle of informare "to train, instruct, educate" (see inform). In Middle English, the same word meant "formative, shaping, plastic, having power to form or animate" (late 14c.). Related: Informatively.

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inspire (v.)

mid-14c., enspiren, "to fill (the mind, heart, etc., with grace, etc.);" also "to prompt or induce (someone to do something)," from Old French enspirer (13c.), from Latin inspirare "blow into, breathe upon," figuratively "inspire, excite, inflame," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + spirare "to breathe" (see spirit (n.)).

The Latin word was used as a loan-translation of Greek pnein in the Bible. General sense of "influence or animate with an idea or purpose" is from late 14c. Also sometimes used in literal sense in Middle English. Related: Inspires; inspiring.

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