Etymology
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angle (v.2)
"to move at an angle, to move diagonally or obliquely," 1741, from angle (n.). Related: Angled; angling.
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angle (v.1)
"to fish with a hook," mid-15c., from Old English angel (n.) "angle, hook, fish-hook," related to anga "hook," from Proto-Germanic *angul-, from PIE *ankulo-, suffixed form of root *ang-/*ank- "to bend" (see angle (n.)). Compare Old English angul, Old Norse öngull, Old High German angul, German Angel "fishhook." Figurative sense "catch or elicit by artful wiles" is recorded from 1580s. Related: Angled; angling.
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Anglist (n.)
"student of English," from German Anglist, from Medieval Latin Angli (see Angle). Related: Anglistics.
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Anglice (adv.)
"in (plain) English," c. 1600, from Medieval Latin Anglice, from Anglicus (see Angle).
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angler (n.)
"fisher with a hook and line," mid-15c. (c. 1300 as a surname); agent noun from angle (v.1).
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angle (n.)
"space or difference in direction between intersecting lines," late 14c., from Old French angle "an angle, a corner" (12c.) and directly from Latin angulus "an angle, a corner," a diminutive form from PIE root *ang-/*ank- "to bend" (source also of Greek ankylos "bent, crooked," Latin ang(u)ere "to compress in a bend, fold, strangle;" Old Church Slavonic aglu "corner;" Lithuanian anka "loop;" Sanskrit ankah "hook, bent," angam "limb;" Old English ancleo "ankle;" Old High German ango "hook").

Figurative sense "point or direction from which one approaches something" is from 1872. Angle-bracket is 1781 in carpentry; 1956 in typography.
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English (n.2)
"spin imparted to a ball" (as in billiards), 1860, from French anglé "angled" (see angle (n.)), which is similar to Anglais "English."
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Anglicism (n.)

1640s, "Englished language; that which is peculiar to England in speech or writing," from Latin Anglicus "of the English" (see Angle) + -ism. As an instance of this, "a word or expression used particularly in England and not in America," from 1781.

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ankylosaurus (n.)
Cretaceous armored dinosaur, 1907, Modern Latin, from Greek ankylos "bent, curved" (see angle (n.)) + -saurus. Said to be a reference to the curved ribs.
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anchylosis (n.)
"stiffening of joints caused by consolidation or fusion of two or more bones into one," 1713, from Greek ankylos "crooked" (see angle (n.)) + -osis. Related: Anchylotic.
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