Etymology
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analyse (v.)

chiefly British English spelling of analyze (q.v.), which was the former spelling there (as in Johnson's dictionary). In 17c. analize also was used.

Analyse is better than analyze, but merely as being the one of the two equally indefensible forms that has won. The correct but now impossible form would be analysize (or analysise), with analysist for existing analyst. [Fowler]
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psychoanalysis (n.)

"the theory or therapy of treating mental disorders by investigating unconscious elements and bringing repressed fears and conflicts to the patient's awareness," from Psychoanalyse, coined 1896 in French by Freud from Latinized form of Greek psykhē "the soul, mind, spirit; understanding" (see psyche) + German Analyse, from Greek analysis (see analysis). Freud earlier used psychische analyse (1894).

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analysis (n.)
1580s, "resolution of anything complex into simple elements" (opposite of synthesis), from Medieval Latin analysis (15c.), from Greek analysis "solution of a problem by analysis," literally "a breaking up, a loosening, releasing," noun of action from analyein "unloose, release, set free; to loose a ship from its moorings," in Aristotle, "to analyze," from ana "up, back, throughout" (see ana-) + lysis "a loosening," from lyein "to unfasten" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart").

Meaning "statement presenting results of an analytic process" is from 1660s. Psychological sense is from 1890. English also formerly had a noun analyse (1630s), from French analyse, from Medieval Latin analysis. Phrase in the final (or last) analysis (1844), translates French en dernière analyse.
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analyst (n.)
1650s, "one versed in algebraic analysis, mathematician skilled in algebraic geometry," from French analyste "a person who analyzes," from analyser, from analyse "analysis," from Medieval Latin analysis (see analysis). As a short form of psychoanalyst, attested from 1914; the one analyzed is an analysand (1933). Greek analyter meant "a deliverer."
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analyze (v.)
c. 1600, of material things, "to dissect, take to pieces," from French analyser, from the noun analyse "analysis" (see analysis). Of literature, "examine critically to get the essence of," from 1610s; meaning in chemistry ("resolve a compound into elements") dates from 1660s. General sense of "to examine closely" dates from 1809; psychological sense is from 1909. Related: Analyzed; analyzing.
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