Etymology
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Puck 

name of the mischievous fairy in "A Midsummer Night's Dream," in 16c. the name of a fairy of high repute (his disguised name was Robin Goodfellow or Friar Rush), also generally, "an elf, fairy, or sprite;" probably from Middle English pouke "devil, evil spirit" (c. 1300; early 13c. in place-names), from Old English puca, pucel "goblin," which is cognate with Old Norse puki "devil, fiend," a word of unknown origin (compare pug). Celtic origins also have been proposed.

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Percocet 

by 1991, a North American brand name for oxycodone/acetaminophen.

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Crow 

Indian tribe of the American Midwest, the name is a rough translation of their own name, Apsaruke.

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Comanche (n.)

Native-American people from the southwestern Great Plains, 1819, from Spanish, from a word in a Shoshonean language, such as Ute kimánci "enemy, foreigner." Their territory was Comancheria. Comanchero was a 19c. name given to Hispanic and American traders who dealt with the Comanches.

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Stars and Stripes (n.)

"American flag," attested from 1782. Stars and Bars as a name for the Confederate flag is attested from 1863.

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Spandex (n.)

synthetic fiber, 1959, American English, proprietary name, an arbitrary formation from expand + commercial suffix -ex.

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Panama 

Central American nation; the name is used of a political jurisdiction by 1530s in Spanish, probably from an unknown Guarani word, traditionally said to mean "place of many fish." Originally the name of the settlement founded 1519 (destroyed 1671 but subsequently rebuilt). Related: Panamanian. Panama hat, made from the leaves of the screw pine, is attested from 1833, a misnomer, because it originally was made in Ecuador, but perhaps so called in American English because it was distributed north from Panama City. Panama red as a variety of Central American marijuana is attested from 1967.

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Bolivia 

South American republic, founded 1825, named for Simon Bolivar (1783-1830), statesman and soldier.

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Chickasaw 

native American people formerly of Mississippi and Alabama, 1670s, from Chickasaw Chikasha, the people's name for themselves. Also their (Muskogean) language.

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Tony 

1947, awards given by American Theatre Wing (New York), from nickname of U.S. actress, manager, and producer Antoinette Perry (1888-1946).

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