Etymology
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already (adv.)

c. 1300, "in a state of readiness" (an adjectival sense, now obsolete), literally "fully ready, quite prepared," a contraction of all ready; see all + ready (adj.). Compare Norwegian, Danish allerede "already." As an adverb, "by this time, previous to some specified time," late 14c. The colloquial use in U.S. as a terminal emphatic (as in enough, already!) is attested from 1903, translating Yiddish shoyn, which is used in same sense. The pattern also is attested in Pennsylvania German and in South African.

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deja vu 

"feeling of having previously experienced a present situation," 1903, from French déjà vu, literally "already seen." The phenomenon also is known as promnesia. Similar phenomena are déjà entendu "already heard" (of music, etc.), 1965; and déjà lu "already read" (1960).

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fait accompli (n.)
"a scheme already carried into execution," 19c., French, literally "an accomplished fact." See feat and accomplish.
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deviance (n.)

1944, "departure from a standard in behavior or state;" see deviant + -ance. A sociologists' word, perhaps coined because statisticians and astronomers already had claimed deviation.

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retrain (v.)

also re-train, "train again, teach (someone already skilled or trained) a new skill," 1905, from re- "back, again" + train (v.). Related: Retrained; retraining.

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loc. cit. 
abbreviation of Latin loco citato or locus citatus "in the place (already) cited;" hence, "in the book that has been previously quoted." See locus, cite. In use in English books by 1704.
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reformatory (adj.)

"having a tendency to reform," 1704, from past-participle stem of Latin reformare "to transform, change" (see reform (v.)) + -ory. As a noun, "house of correction for juveniles who have already begun a career of vice or crime," from 1758.

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-more 

comparative word-forming element added to already comparative adjectives and adverbs, Middle English (innermore, outermore, furthermore, overmore, etc.), from more (adv.). The formation also was in Old Norse and the English use might be from Scandinavian.

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decomposition (n.)

"act or process of separating the constituent elements of a compound body; state of being decomposed,"1762, from de- "the opposite of" + composition. An earlier word in the same form meant "further compounding of already composite things" (1650s; see decomposite).

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ibid. (adv.)
"at the place or in the book already mentioned" (used to avoid repetition of references), 1660s, abbreviation of Latin ibidem "in the same place, just there," from ibi "there," pronominal adverb of place, + demonstrative suffix -dem. Also ibid, but properly with the period.
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