Etymology
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alluring (adj.)
"appealing to desires," 1570s, present-participle adjective from allure (v.). Related: Alluringly.
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allure (v.)
"tempt by the offering of something desired," c. 1400, from Anglo-French alurer, Old French aleurer "to attract, captivate; train (a falcon to hunt)," from à "to" (see ad-) + loirre "falconer's lure," from a Frankish word (see lure), perhaps influenced by French allure "gait, way of walking." Related: Allured; alluring.
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allurement (n.)
1540s, "means of alluring;" see allure (v.) + -ment. Meaning "act of alluring" is recorded from 1560s. Verbal noun alluring (n.) "action of attracting" is from 1530s; allurance (1580s) sometimes has been used as well.
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tempting (adj.)
"inviting, seductive, alluring," 1590s, present-participle adjective from tempt (v.). Related: Temptingly.
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inviting (adj.)
"attractive, alluring," c. 1600, present-participle adjective from invite (v.). Related: Invitingly.
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meretricious (adj.)

1620s, "pertaining to harlots," from Latin meretricius "of or pertaining to prostitutes," from meretrix (genitive meretricis) "prostitute," literally "woman who earns money," from merere, mereri "to earn, gain" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (2) "to get a share of something"). Meaning "gaudily alluring, alluring by false attractions" is from 1630s. Related: Meretriciously; meretriciousness.

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baited (adj.)
c. 1600, "furnished with bait," past-participle adjective from bait (v.2). Hence, in a figurative sense, "exciting, alluring" (1650s). For bated breath see bate (v.1).
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delicatessen (n.)

1877, "delicacies, articles of fine food," American English, from German delikatessen, plural of delikatesse "a delicacy, fine food," from French délicatesse (1560s), from délicat "fine," from Latin delicatus "alluring, delightful, dainty" (see delicate). As a store where such things are sold, 1901, short for delicatessen shop.

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blandiloquence (n.)

"flattery in speech," 1650s, from Latin blandiloquentia, from blandiloquens "speaking flatteringly," from blandus "flattering, alluring" (see bland) + loquens, from loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak"). Blandiloquous is attested earlier (1610s). Latin had also blandiloquentulus "flattering in speech."

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seductive (adj.)

"tending to lead aside or astray; alluring, enticing," 1740, from Latin seduct-, past-participle stem of seducere "lead away, lead aside or astray" (see seduce) + -ive. Related: Seductively; seductiveness. Middle English had seducious "deceitful, devious" (mid-15c.).

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