Etymology
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all (adj./adv.)

Old English eall "every, entire, the whole quantity of" (adj.), "fully, wholly, entirely" (adv.), from Proto-Germanic *alnaz (source also of Old Frisian, Old High German al; German all, alle; Old Norse allr; Gothic alls), with no certain connection outside Germanic. As a noun, in Old English, "all that is, everything."

Combinations with all meaning "wholly, without limit" were common in Old English (such as eall-halig "all-holy," eall-mihtig "all-mighty") and the method continued to form new compound words throughout the history of English. Middle English had al-wher "wherever; whenever" (early 14c.); al-soon "as soon as possible," al-what (c. 1300) "all sorts of things, whatever."

Of the common modern phrases with it, at all "in any way" is from mid-14c., and all "and everything (else)" is from 1530s, all but "everything short of" is from 1590s. First record of all out "to one's full powers" is 1880. All clear as a signal of "no danger" is recorded from 1902. All right, indicative of assent or approval, is attested by 1837; the meaning "satisfactory, acceptable" is by 1939, from the notion of "turning out well."

The use of a, a' as an abbreviation of all (as in Burns' "A Man's a Man for A' that") is a modern Scottishism but has history in English to 13c.

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all-in (adj.)
"without restrictions," 1890, from the adverbial phrase; see all + in (adv.).
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all-inclusive (adj.)
1813, from all + inclusive. Related: All-inclusively; all-inclusiveness.
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all-purpose (adj.)
"suitable for every use or occasion," 1877, from all + purpose (n.).
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catch-all (n.)

also catchall, "something used as a general receptacle for odds and ends," 1838, from catch (v.) + all.

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all-nighter (n.)

"incident of staying up all night," 1870, from the adverbial phrase; see all + night. By 1930 as "person who stays up all night."

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all-American (n.)
1888, plural, as the name of a barnstorming baseball team composed of players from various teams across the United States. From all + American.
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cure-all (n.)

1835, "panacea, remedy for all kinds of diseases," from cure (v.) + all. As a name of various plants, it is attested from 1793. Compare heal-all, panacea.

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all-sorts (n.)
name in old taverns and beer-shops for a beverage composed of remnants of other liquors mixed together, 1823, from the adjectival phrase; see all + plural of sort (n.).
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all-star (adj.)
1893, originally of theatrical casts, from all + star (n.) in the "celebrated person" sense. From 1898 in reference to sports teams.
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