Etymology
Advertisement
align (v.)

early 15c., "to copulate" (of wolves, dogs), literally "to range (things) in a line," from Old French alignier "set, lay in line" (Modern French aligner), from à "to" (see ad-) + lignier "to line," from Latin lineare "reduce to a straight line," from linea (see line (n.)). Transitive or reflexive sense of "to fall into line" is from 1853. International political sense is attested from 1934. The French spelling with -g- is unetymological, and aline was an early form in English. Related: Aligned; aligning.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
alignment (n.)
1790, "arrangement in a line," from French alignement, from aligner "to arrange in a line" (see align). Political sense is from 1933.
Related entries & more 
misaligned (adj.)

"faulty or incorrect arrangement in line," 1903, from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + past participle of align.

Related entries & more 
non-aligned (adj.)

also nonaligned, by 1960 in geopolitical sense, from non- + past participle of align. Non-alignment (also nonalignment) in this sense is attested from 1934.

Related entries & more 
realign (v.)

also re-align, by 1876 in reference to railroad tracks, "align again or anew," from re- "back, again" + align or else a back-formation from realignment. By 1923 in reference to European international relations, "return to previously aligned positions." Related: Realigned; realigning.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
dress (v.)

c. 1300, "make straight; direct, guide, control; prepare for cooking," from Old French dresser, drecier "raise (oneself); address, prepare; lift, raise, hoist; set up, arrange, set (a table), serve (food); straighten, put right, direct," from Vulgar Latin *directiare "make straight," from Latin directus "direct, straight," past participle of dirigere "set straight," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + regere "to direct, to guide, keep straight" (from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line").

Sense of "decorate, adorn" is from late 14c., as is that of "put on clothing." The older sense survives in military dress ranks "align columns of troops." Of males, in reference to the position of the sex organ in trousers, by 1961.

Dress up "attire elaborately, put on one's best clothing" is from 1670s; dress down "wear clothes less formal than expected" is by 1960. Transitive use of dress (someone) down, "scold, reprimand," is by 1876, earlier simply dress (1769), in which the sense is ironical. In Middle English, dress up meant "get up" and dress down meant "to kneel." Related: Dressed; dressing.

Related entries & more