Etymology
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airline (n.)
also air-line, 1813, "beeline, straight line between two points on the earth's surface" (as through the air, rather than over terrain), from air (n.1) + line (n.). From 1853 and in later 19c. especially in reference to railways that ran directly between big cities in the U.S. instead of meandering from town to town in search of stock subscriptions as early railways typically did. Meaning "public aircraft transportation company" is from 1914.
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no-show (n.)

also no show, "someone who fails to keep an appointment or claim a reservation," by 1941, from no + show (v.), in the "show up, appear" sense. Originally airline jargon, in reference to the commercial airlines' no-show list, of "people who make reservations, are in a great hurry and say they will pick up their tickets at the field. Then they fail to call in and cancel their seats and never show up at the field." ["Popular Aviation," December 1934]

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