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aim (n.)
late 14c., "a purpose, thing intended;" from aim (v.) or from nouns from the verb in Old French. Meaning "action of aiming" is from early 15c. To take aim originally was make aim (early 15c.).
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aim (v.)
c. 1300, "to estimate (number or size), calculate, count" (senses now obsolete), from Old French aesmer, esmer (Old North French amer) "to value, rate; count, estimate," ultimately from Latin aestimare "appraise, determine the value of" (see esteem (v.)).

Meaning in English apparently developed from "calculate," to "calculate with a view to action, plan," then to "direct a missile, a blow, etc." (late 14c.). Also used in Middle English of directing a letter, planting an altar, pitching a tent. Intransitive sense "intend, attempt" (early 14c.) was used by Shakespeare but is now considered colloquial. Related: Aimed; aiming.
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aimless (adj.)
"without aim or purpose," 1620s, from aim (n.) + -less. Related: Aimlessly; aimlessness.
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*aim- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to copy." 

It forms all or part of: emulate; emulation; emulous;  image; imaginary; imagination; imaginative; imagine; imago; imitable; imitate; imitative; imitator; inimitable.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin imago "image," aemulus "emulous," imitari "to copy, portray, imitate;" Hittite himma- "imitation, substitute."

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imitator (n.)

1520s, from French imitateur (14c.) or directly from Latin imitator "a copyist; a mimic," from imitari "to copy, imitate" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy").

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imitable (adj.)

1550s, from French imitable (16c.), from Latin imitabilis "that may be imitated," from imitari "to copy, portray" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy"). Related: Imitability.

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imitative (adj.)

1580s, probably from imitate + -ive; or else from French imitatif, from Late Latin imitativus, from imitat-, stem of Latin imitari "to copy, portray" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy").

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imitate (v.)

1530s, a back-formation from imitation or imitator, or else from Latin imitatus, past participle of imitari "to copy, portray" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy"). Related: Imitated; imitating. An Old English word for this was æfterhyrigan.

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imitation (n.)

c. 1400, "emulation; act of copying," from Old French imitacion, from Latin imitationem (nominative imitatio) "a copying, imitation," noun of action from past participle stem of imitari "to copy, portray, imitate," from PIE *im-eto-, from root *aim- "to copy." Meaning "an artificial likeness" is from c. 1600. As an adjective, from 1840.

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imagination (n.)

"faculty of the mind which forms and manipulates images," mid-14c., ymaginacion, from Old French imaginacion "concept, mental picture; hallucination," from Latin imaginationem (nominative imaginatio) "imagination, a fancy," noun of action from past participle stem of imaginari "to form an image of, represent"), from imago "an image, a likeness," from stem of imitari "to copy, imitate" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy") 

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