Etymology
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agriculture (n.)
mid-15c., "tillage, cultivation of large areas of land to provide food," from Late Latin agricultura "cultivation of the land," a contraction of agri cultura "cultivation of land," from agri, genitive of ager "a field" (from PIE root *agro- "field") + cultura "cultivation" (see culture (n.)). In Old English, the idea could be expressed by eorðtilþ.
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aggie (n.1)
"college student studying agriculture," by 1880, American English college slang, from agriculture + -ie.
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horticulture (n.)
1670s, "cultivation of a garden," coined from Latin hortus "garden" (from PIE root *gher- (1) "to grasp, enclose"), probably on model of agriculture. Famously punned upon by Dorothy Parker.
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floriculture (n.)
1822, from Latin floris, genitive of flos "flower" (see flora) + -culture on analogy of agriculture. Related: Floricultural; floriculturist.
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agricultural (adj.)

"of or pertaining to or engaged in agriculture," 1766, from agriculture + -al (1). Related: Agriculturally; agriculturalist.

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verbiculture (n.)
"the production of words," 1873, from Latin verbum "word" (see verb) + ending from agriculture, etc. Coined by Fitzedward Hall, in "Modern English." He was scolded for it in the "Edinburgh Review."
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ag (n.)

abbreviation of agriculture, attested from 1839s (in Secretary of Ag., etc.); by 1880s in reference to college courses, American English.

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agribusiness (n.)

also agri-business, "agriculture as conducted on commercial principles, the business and technology of farming; industries dealing in agricultural produce and services;" 1955, a compound formed from agriculture + business.

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permaculture (n.)

"design based on systems simulating or utilizing patterns and features observed in natural ecosystems," by 1978, from permanent + -culture, in this case abstracted from agriculture.

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arboriculture (n.)
"the are of planting, training, and trimming trees and shrubs," 1822, from Latin arbor, arboris "tree" (see arbor (n.2)) + -culture, abstracted from agriculture. Perhaps modeled on French arboriculture (by 1808). Related: Arboricultural; arboriculturist (1825).
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