Etymology
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agreement (n.)

c. 1400, "mutual understanding" (among persons), also (of things) "mutual conformity," from Old French agrement, agreement, noun of action from agreer "to please" (see agree). Attested in English by early 15c. as "formal or documentary agreement, terms of settlement."

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reality (n.)

1540s, "quality of being real, objective reality," from French réalité and directly from Medieval Latin realitatem (nominative realitas), from Late Latin realis (see real (adj.)). Also compare realty, which was the older form of the word in the sense of "reality" (mid-15c.).

Meaning "real existence, what is real, the aggregate of all that is real" is from 1640s; that of "the real state (of something)" is from 1680s. Sometimes 17c.-18c. it also meant "sincerity." Reality-based is attested from 1960, in marriage counseling. Reality television is attested from 1991.

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compact (n.1)

"an agreement or contract between two or more parties," 1590s, from Latin compactum "agreement," noun use of neuter past participle of compacisci "come to agreement," from com "with, together" (see com-) + pacisci "to covenant, contract" (from PIE root *pag- "to fasten").

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Concorde (n.)

supersonic passenger airliner operating from 1976 to 2003, from French concorde, literally "harmony, agreement" (see concord (n.)), reflecting the Anglo-French collaborative agreement that produced it.

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global warming (n.)

by 1983 as the name for a condition of overall rising temperatures on Earth and attendant consequences as a result of human activity. Originally theoretical, popularized as a reality from 1989.

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misdoubt (v.)

1530s, "to have doubts (of the reality of), to suspect, to regard (the truth or reality of) with suspicion," from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + doubt (v.). Meaning "to fear or suspect (the existence of something evil) is from 1560s. Intransitive sense of "entertain doubt" is from 1630s. Related: Misdoubted; misdoubting. As a noun, "irresolution," 1590s.

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GATT 

1947, acronym from General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.

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realistic (adj.)

1829, of art, literature, etc., "true to reality, exhibiting realism in description or representation;" 1831 as "involving a practical view of life" (opposed to idealistic); see realist + -ic. Related: Realistically.

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consonance (n.)

late 14c., "pleasing combination of sounds, harmony," from Old French consonance (12c.) "consonance, rhyme" and directly from Latin consonantia "harmony, agreement," from consonantem (nominative consonans) "agreeing in sound," present participle of consonare "to sound together, sound aloud" (see consonant (adj.)).

From early 15c. as "agreement among persons as to facts or opinions." Meaning "accord or agreement of sounds in words or syllables" is from 1580s.

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