Etymology
Advertisement
agreement (n.)
c. 1400, "mutual understanding" (among persons), also (of things) "mutual conformity," from Old French agrement, agreement, noun of action from agreer "to please" (see agree). Early 15c. as "formal or documentary agreement, terms of settlement."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
disagreement (n.)

late 15c., "refusal to agree or assent," from disagree + -ment. From 1570s as "difference in form or essence," also "difference of opinion or sentiments," perhaps a separate formation from dis- + agreement. From 1580s as "a falling out, contention." As "unsuitableness, unfitness," by 1702.

Related entries & more 
compact (n.1)

"an agreement or contract between two or more parties," 1590s, from Latin compactum "agreement," noun use of neuter past participle of compacisci "come to agreement," from com "with, together" (see com-) + pacisci "to covenant, contract" (from PIE root *pag- "to fasten").

Related entries & more 
Concorde (n.)

supersonic passenger airliner operating from 1976 to 2003, from French concorde, literally "harmony, agreement" (see concord (n.)), reflecting the Anglo-French collaborative agreement that produced it.

Related entries & more 
GATT 
1947, acronym from General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
prenup (n.)
by 1988 as a shortening of prenuptial agreement (see prenuptial).
Related entries & more 
consonance (n.)

late 14c., "pleasing combination of sounds, harmony," from Old French consonance (12c.) "consonance, rhyme" and directly from Latin consonantia "harmony, agreement," from consonantem (nominative consonans) "agreeing in sound," present participle of consonare "to sound together, sound aloud" (see consonant (adj.)).

From early 15c. as "agreement among persons as to facts or opinions." Meaning "accord or agreement of sounds in words or syllables" is from 1580s.

Related entries & more 
pact (n.)

"an agreement between persons or parties," early 15c., from Old French pacte "agreement, treaty, compact" (14c.) and directly from Latin pactum "agreement, contract, covenant," noun use of neuter past participle of pacisci "to covenant, to agree, make a treaty," from PIE root *pag- "to fasten." Related: Paction "act of making a pact."

Related entries & more 
convenance (n.)

late 15c., "a covenant or agreement," from French convenance "convention, agreement, convenience," from convenant, present participle of convenir "to come together; join, fit, suit" (see convene). Meaning "conventional propriety" is from 1847.

Related entries & more 
consensus (n.)

1854, "a general accord or agreement of different parts in effecting a given purpose," originally a term in physiology; 1861, of persons "a general agreement in opinion;" from Latin consensus "agreement, accord," past participle of consentire "feel together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sentire "to feel" (see sense (n.)). There is an isolated instance of the word from 1633.

Related entries & more