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agreeable (adj.)
late 14c., of things, "to one's liking, pleasant, satisfactory, suitable," from Old French agreable "pleasing; in agreement; consenting" (12c., Modern French agréable), from agreer "to satisfy; to take pleasure in" (see agree). Of persons, "willing or ready to consent," mid-15c. Related: Agreeably; agreeability; agreeableness. To do the agreeable (1825) was to "act in a courteous manner."
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disagreeable (adj.)

c. 1400, "not in agreement, unamiable," from Old French desagreable (13c.), from des- "not, opposite of" (see dis-) + agreable "pleasing; in agreement; consenting" (see agreeable). Meaning "not in accord with one's taste, offensive to the mind or senses" is from 1690s. Related: Disagreeably; disagreeableness. Slightly earlier in same sense was unagreeable (late 14c.). Related: Disagreeability.

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agree (v.)

late 14c., "to give consent, assent," from Old French agreer "to please, satisfy; to receive with favor, take pleasure in" (12c.), a contraction of phrase a gré "favorably, of good will," literally "to (one's) liking" (or a like contraction in Medieval Latin) from a, from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + Old French gre, gret "that which pleases," from Latin gratum, neuter of gratus "pleasing, welcome, agreeable" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gwere- (2) "to favor").

In Middle English also "to please, gratify, satisfy," a sense preserved in agreeable. Of parties, "come to agreement; make a settlement," mid-15c.; meaning "to be in harmony in opinions" is from late 15c. Of things, "to coincide," from 1520s. To agree to differ is from 1785 (also agree to disagree, 1792). Related: Agreed; agreeing.

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palatable (adj.)

1660s, "good-tasting, agreeable to the taste," from palate + -able. Figurative sense of "agreeable to the mind or feelings" is from 1680s. Related: Palatably; palatability.

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amiability (n.)
"quality of being friendly and agreeable," 1779, from amiable + -ity. Amiableness is recorded from 1530s.
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suave (adj.)
early 15c., "gracious, kindly, pleasant, delightful," from Latin suavis "agreeable, sweet, pleasant (to the senses), delightful," from PIE root *swād- "sweet, pleasant" (see sweet (adj.)). In reference to persons, sense of "smoothly agreeable" first recorded 1815 (implied in suavity). Related: Suavely.
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pleasant (adj.)

late 14c., plesaunte (early 14c. as a surname), "pleasing or acceptable to God;" also "agreeable, desirable; delightful, delicious; satisfying to the mind or senses;" of persons, "charming, gracious," from Old French plaisant "pleasant, pleasing, agreeable" (12c.), present participle of plaisir "to please, give pleasure to, satisfy," from Latin placere "to be acceptable, be liked, be approved" (see please). Pleasantry has the word's modern French sense of "funny, jocular, witty." Related: Pleasantly. Pleasantness "pleasing or agreeable character or quality" is attested from 1520s.

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graciousness (n.)
late 14c., "attractiveness, agreeable quality," early 15c., from gracious + -ness. From 1630s as "courtesy, politeness."
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tasteful (adj.)
1610s, "having an agreeable taste;" from taste + -ful. From 1756 as "having or showing good taste." Related: Tastefully; tastefulness.
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likeable (adj.)
also likable, 1730, a hybrid from like (v.) + -able. Related: Likeableness. Middle English had likeworthy (from Old English licwyrðe "agreeable, acceptable").
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