Etymology
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after (adv., prep.)

Old English æfter "behind; later in time" (adv.); "behind in place; later than in time; in pursuit, following with intent to overtake" (prep.), from of "off" (see off (adv.)) + -ter, a comparative suffix; thus the original meaning was "more away, farther off." Compare Old Norse eptir "after," Old Frisian efter, Dutch achter, Old High German aftar, Gothic aftra "behind;" also see aft. Cognate with Greek apotero "farther off," Old Persian apataram "further."

From c. 1300 as "in imitation of." As a conjunction, "subsequent to the time that," from late Old English. After hours "hours after regular working hours" is from 1814. Afterwit "wisdom that comes too late" is attested from c. 1500 but seems to have fallen from use. After you as an expression in yielding precedence is recorded by 1650.

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after-burner (n.)
1947, "device on the tailpipe of a jet engine to increase thrust," from after + burner.
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after-dinner (adj.)

"that happens or is given after dinner, has been eaten," 1730, from after + dinner.

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after-care (n.)
"care given after a course of medical treatment," 1854, from after + care (n.).
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afterlife (n.)
also after-life, 1590s, "a future life" (especially after resurrection), from after + life.
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afterword (n.)
1879, from after + word (n.). An English substitute for epilogue.
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aftershock (n.)
also after-shock, "smaller earthquake after a larger one," 1894, from after + shock (n.1).
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afterglow (n.)
also after-glow, "glow in the western sky after sunset," 1829, from after + glow (n.).
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aftermarket (adj.)

in reference to automobile replacement parts not made by the original manufacturer, 1940, American English, from after + market.

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afterthought (n.)

1660s, "a later thought," from after + thought (n.). As "reflection after an act," 1680s. The colloquial sense of "youngest child of a family" (especially one born much later than the others) is by 1902.

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