Etymology
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Adrian 

masc. proper name, from Latin Adrianus, properly Hadrianus, literally "of the Adriatic" (see Adriatic). A name taken by several popes, including the only English pontiff, Nicholas Brakespear (died 1159). The proper name Adrienne, etc., when not a fem. form of this, is a transposition of Ariadne: Adriane is the usual form of Ariadne in Chaucer ("House of Fame," etc.).

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Pyrenees 

chain of mountains between France and Spain, 1550s, from French Pyrénées, from Latin Pyrenæi montes, from Greek Pyrēnē, name of a daughter of Bebryx/Bebrycius who was beloved of Herakles; she is said to be buried in these mountains (or that the mountains are the tomb Herakles reared over her corpse).

The name is said to mean literally "fruit-stone," but Room says it might be Greek pyr "fire" + eneos "dumb, speechless," which perhaps translates or folk-etymologizes a Celtic goddess name. "In medieval times there was no overall name for the range and local people would have known only the names of individual mountains and valleys" [Adrian Room, "Place Names of the World," 2nd ed., 2006]. Related: Pyrenean.

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