Etymology
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admit (v.)
late 14c., "let in," from Latin admittere "admit, give entrance, allow to enter; grant an audience," of acts, "let be done, allow, permit," from ad "to" (see ad-) + mittere "let go, send" (see mission). Sense of "to concede in argument as valid or true" is first recorded early 15c. In Middle English sometimes also amit, after Old French amettre, which was refashioned 15c. Related: Admitted; Admitting.
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admitted (adj.)
1550s, "received," past-participle adjective from admit (v.). As "received as true or valid" from 1780 (implied in admittedly).
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readmit (v.)

also re-admit, 1610s, "to admit again," from re- "back, again" + admit. Related: Readmitted; readmitting.

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admittance (n.)
1580s, "the action of admitting," formed in English from admit + -ance (if from Latin, it would have been *admittence; French uses accès in this sense). Used formerly in figurative senses where admission now prevails. Admissure was used in this sense from mid-15c.
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usher (v.)
1590s, "conduct, escort, admit ceremoniously," from usher (n.). Related: Ushered; ushering.
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air-hole (n.)

"an opening to admit or discharge air," 1766, from air (n.1) + hole (n.).

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pre-admission (n.)

also preadmission, "previous admission; admission beforehand," 1825, from pre- + admission. Related: Pre-admit; pre-admitted.

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air-port (n.2)
"small opening in the side of a ship to admit air and light," 1788, from air (n.1) + port (n.2).
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mouse-hole (n.)

"very small hole where mice go in and out, a hole only big enough to admit a mouse," early 15c., from mouse (n.) + hole (n.).

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skylight (n.)
1670s, "light from the sky," from sky (n.) + light (n.). Meaning "small opening in a roof to admit light" is recorded from 1680s. Related: Sky-lit.
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