Etymology
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admiration (n.)

early 15c., "wonder," from Old French admiration "astonishment, surprise" (14c., corrected from earlier amiracion), or directly from Latin admirationem (nominative admiratio) "a wondering at, admiration," noun of state from past-participle stem of admirari "regard with wonder, be astonished," from ad "to; with regard to" (see ad-) + mirari "to wonder," from mirus "wonderful" (see miracle). The sense has gradually weakened since 16c. toward "high regard, esteem."

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furore (n.)

1790, Italian form of furor, borrowed into English originally in the sense "enthusiastic popular admiration;" it later descended to mean the same thing as furor and lost its usefulness.

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admirable (adj.)

mid-15c., "worthy of admiration," from Latin admirabilis "admirable, wonderful," from admirari "to admire" (see admire). In early years it also carried a stronger sense of "awe-inspiring, marvelous."

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coquette (n.)

"woman who endeavors to gain the admiration of men, a flirt," 1660s, from French fem. of coquet (male) "flirt" (see coquet, which was used of women from 1610s).

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wally (n.)

term of admiration, Scottish, early 16c., of unknown origin. As a masc. proper name, a diminutive of Walter, and this might be the source of the teen slang term "unfashionable person" (1969).

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raving (adj.)

late 15c., "delirious, frenzied," present-participle adjective from rave (v.). The sense of "remarkable, fit to excite admiration" is from 1841, hence slang superlative use.

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august (adj.)

"inspiring reverence and admiration, solemnly grand," 1660s, from Latin augustus "venerable, majestic, magnificent, noble," perhaps originally "consecrated by the augurs, with favorable auguries" (see augur (n.)); or else [de Vaan] "that which is increased" (see augment).

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compliment (v.)

1610s, "pay a compliment to, flatter or gratify by expression of admiration, respect, etc.," from French complimenter, from compliment (see compliment (n.)). By 1690s as "manifest kindness or regard for by a gift or favor." Related: Complimented; complimenting.

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provable (adj.)

late 14c., "approvable, worthy of praise or admiration" (a sense now obsolete); c. 1400, "that can be proved, capable of being demonstrated," from Old French provable, from prover "show; convince; put to the test" (see prove (v.)). Related: Provably; provability; provableness.

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fucker (n.)

1590s, "one who copulates," agent noun from fuck (v.). By 1893 as a general term of abuse (or admiration).

DUCK F-CK-R. The man who has the care of the poultry on board a ſhip of war. ["Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," 1796]
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