Etymology
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sociology (n.)

the science of social phenomena, 1842, from French sociologie, a hybrid coined 1830 by French philosopher Isidore Auguste Comte (1798-1857), from Latin socius "associate" (see social (adj.)) + Greek-derived suffix -logie (see -logy).

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administrative (adj.)

"pertaining to administration, having to do with the managing of public affairs," 1731, from Latin administrativus, from administrat-, past-participle stem of administrare "to manage, control, superintend" (see administer). Related: Administratively.

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sociological (adj.)

1861; see sociology + -ical. Related: Sociologically.

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matrifocal (adj.)

1952, in reference to families or households where the mother has responsibility and authority, a term from sociology, from matri- + focal.

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prefecture (n.)

"administrative district, office, or jurisdiction of a prefect," mid-15c., from Old French préfecture (13c.) and directly from Latin praefectura, or assembled locally from prefect + -ure. Also used as the English equivalent to Chinese fu, "an administrative division consisting of several districts" (1885). 

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nisi (conj.)

Latin, "unless," occurring in legal and administrative phrases used in English, from ni "not " + si "if."

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apparat (n.)

"administrative machinery of the Communist Party in Russia," 1950, from Russian, from German apparat "apparatus, instrument," from Latin apparatus "tools, implements" (see apparatus).

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Presidium (n.)

permanent administrative committee of the U.S.S.R., 1924, from Russian prezidium, from Latin praesidium "a presiding over, defense," from praesidere "to protect," literally "to sit before" (see preside).

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dysfunction (n.)

"failure to function, abnormality or impairment of function," 1914, from dys- "bad, abnormal, difficult" + function (n.). Originally in anatomy and medicine; in sociology by 1949.

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