Etymology
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administration (n.)

mid-14c., administracioun, "act of giving or dispensing;" late 14c., "management (of a business, property, etc.), act of administering," from Latin administrationem (nominative administratio) "aid, help, cooperation; direction, management," noun of action from past-participle stem of administrare "to help, assist; manage, control, guide, superintend; rule, direct," from ad "to" (see ad-) + ministrare "to serve, attend, wait upon," from minister "inferior, servant, priest's assistant" (see minister (n.)).

It is attested by early 15c. as "management of a deceased person's estate under a commission from authority." The sense of "management of public affairs" is from 1680s; hence, "executive power in a government" (1731), though in Britain later government was used in this sense. The meaning "a U.S. president's period in office" is recorded by 1796 in the writings of George Washington.

The administration of government, in its largest sense, comprehends all the operations of the body politic, whether legislative, executive, or judiciary; but in its most usual, and perhaps in its most precise, signification, it is limited to executive details, and falls peculiarly within the province of the executive department. ["The Federalist," No. 72 (Hamilton)]
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maladministration (n.)

also mal-administration, "faulty or improper management of affairs, defective conduct in the administration of official duties," 1640s, from mal- + administration. Related: Maladminister (1705).

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FDA 
U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 1930, shortened from Food, Drug, and Insecticide Administration.
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anesthesiologist (n.)

"specialist in the administration of anesthetics," 1943, American English, from anesthesiology + -ist.

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NASA 
U.S. space agency, acronym of National Aeronautics and Space Administration, set up in 1958.
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WPA 
1936, initialism (acronym) from Works Progress Administration, U.S. agency established 1935.
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policy (n.1)
Origin and meaning of policy

["way of management"], late 14c., policie, "study or practice of government; good government;" from Old French policie (14c.) "political organization, civil administration," from Late Latin politia "the state, civil administration," from Greek politeia "state, administration, government, citizenship," from politēs "citizen," from polis "city, state" (see polis).

From early 15c. as "an organized state, organized or established system of government or administration of a state," but this sense has gone with polity. Also from early 15c. as "object or course of conduct, or the principles to be observed in conduct," and thus "prudence or wisdom in action" generally, but especially "the system of measures or the line of conduct which a ruler, minister, government, or party adopts as best for the interests of the country in domestic or foreign affairs."

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M.B.A. 

by 1917, American English, abbreviation of Masters of Business Administration, an educational degree attested by that name by 1912.

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managery (n.)

"domestic administration, the act of managing (a farm or crop)," a word now obsolete, 1630s, from manager + -y (4); or perhaps from manage + -ery.

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administrate (v.)
"manage or direct affairs," 1630s, from Latin administratus, past participle of administrare "manage, control, superintend" (see administer) or else a back-formation from administrator, administration. Related: Administrated; administrating.
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