Etymology
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adjust (v.)
Origin and meaning of adjust

late 14c., ajusten, "to correct, remedy," from Old French ajuster, ajoster "add; assemble; calibrate, gauge, regulate," from Late Latin adiuxtare "to bring near," from ad "to" (see ad-) + Latin iuxta "next, close by," from suffixed form of PIE root *yeug- "to join."

In 16c. French corrected to adjuster, but the pedantic effort was rejected and Modern French has ajouter. Influenced in form and sense by folk-etymology, as if from ad- + iustus "just, equitable, fair." English reborrowed the word by c. 1600 in sense "arrange, settle, compose," from French adjuster "fit (things together) properly, put things in order." Meaning "to arrange (something) so as to conform with (a standard or another thing)" is from 1660s. Insurance sense is from 1755 (see adjuster). To adjust to "get used to" is attested by 1924. Related: Adjusted; adjusting.

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adjustor (n.)
1857, of certain muscles, agent noun in Latin form from adjust (v.).
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adjuster (n.)
1670s, agent noun in English form from adjust. Insurance sense "one who settles the amount to be paid for a claim under a policy, after making proper allowances and deductions," is from 1830.
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well-adjusted (adj.)
1735, in reference to mechanisms, etc., from well (adv.) + past participle of adjust (v.). In reference to emotional balance, recorded from 1959.
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adjustable (adj.)

"capable of being adjusted," 1775, from adjust + -able. Related: Adjustably; adjustability.

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maladjusted (adj.)

"inadequately adjusted," 1846, from mal- + adjusted (see adjust). In modern use, especially "inadequately adapted to one's social environment" (by 1930).

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adjustment (n.)

"a making fit or conformable; the act of adapting to a given purpose; orderly regulation or arrangement," 1640s, from French ajustement (Old French ajostement) or else a native formation from adjust (v.) + -ment.

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readjust (v.)

also re-adjust, 1742, "settle again, put in order again," from re- "back, again" + adjust. Later "adjust in a new way, make a new adjustment" (19c.). OED compares Medieval Latin readjustare. Related: Readjusted; readjusting; readjustment.

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*yeug- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to join."

It forms all or part of: adjoin; adjust; conjoin; conjugal; conjugate; conjugation; conjunct; disjointed; enjoin; injunction; jugular; jostle; joust; join; joinder; joint; jointure; junction; juncture; junta; juxtapose; juxtaposition; rejoin (v.2) "to answer;" rejoinder; subjoin; subjugate; subjugation; subjunctive; syzygy; yoga; yoke; zeugma; zygoma; zygomatic; zygote.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit yugam "yoke," yunjati "binds, harnesses," yogah "union;" Hittite yugan "yoke;" Greek zygon "yoke," zeugnyanai "to join, unite;" Latin iungere "to join," iugum "yoke;" Old Church Slavonic igo, Old Welsh iou "yoke;" Lithuanian jungas "yoke," jungti "to fasten to a yoke;" Old English geoc "yoke."

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revalue (v.)

"value anew, adjust the value of," 1590s, from re- "again, anew" + value (v.). Related: Revalued; revaluing.

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