Etymology
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adjective (n.)

"word used to qualify, limit, or define a noun or noun-like part of speech," late 14c., short for noun adjective, from Old French adjectif (14c.), from Latin adjectivum "that is added to (the noun)," neuter of adjectivus "added," past participle of adicere "throw to, fling at, throw or place (a thing) near," especially "add in addition, add by way of increase," from ad "to" (see ad-) + combining form of iacere "to throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). In Britain from at least 1851 the word often was a euphemism for the taboo adjective bloody.

They ... slept until it was cool enough to go out with their 'Towny,' whose vocabulary contained less than six hundred words, and the Adjective. [Kipling, "Soldiers Three," 1888]
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adjectival (adj.)
1797, from adjective + -al (1). Related: Adjectivally (1773).
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*ad- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to, near, at."

It forms all or part of: abate; ado; ad-; ad hoc; ad lib; adage; adagio; add; adjective; adore; adorn; adult; adverb; advertise; agree; aid; alloy; ally; amontillado; amount; assure; at; atone; exaggerate; paramount; rapport; twit.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit adhi "near;" Latin ad "to, toward;" Old English æt.
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*ye- 

*yē-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to throw, impel."

It forms all or part of: abject; abjection; adjacence; adjacent; adjective; aphetic; catheter; circumjacent; conjecture; deject; ease; ejaculate; eject; enema; gist; ictus; interjacent; inject; interject; interjection; jess; jet (v.1) "to sprout or spurt forth, shoot out;" jet (n.1) "stream of water;" jete; jetsam; jettison; jetton; jetty (n.) "pier;" joist; jut; object; objection; objective; paresis; project; projectile; reject; rejection; subjacent; subject; subjective; trajectory.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Hittite ijami "I make;" Latin iacere "to throw, cast."

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Ethiopian (n.)
1550s; see Ethiop + -ian. As an adjective from 1680s; earlier adjective was Ethiopic (1650s).
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inebriated (adj.)
"drunken," c. 1600, past-participle adjective from inebriate. The earlier adjective was inebriate (late 15c.).
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blithesome (adj.)
"full of gaiety, cheerful," 1724, from blithe + -some (1). An adjective from an adjective. Related: Blithesomely; blithesomeness.
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accumulated (adj.)
1690s, past-participle adjective from accumulate (v.). The earlier adjective was accumulate (1530s, from Latin past participle accumulatus).
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crenelated (adj.)

"furnished with crenels," 1823, past-participle adjective from crenelate. The Middle English past-participle adjective was carneled.

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irritating (adj.)
"that causes annoyance," 1707, present-participle adjective from irritate (v.). Related: Irritatingly. Earlier adjective forms were irritative (1680s), irritatory (1650s).
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