Etymology
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adhesion (n.)
Origin and meaning of adhesion

1620s, "act or state of sticking or being stuck, a being united or attached," from French adhésion or directly from Latin adhaesionem (nominative adhaesio) "a sticking to," noun of action from past-participle stem of adhaerare "to stick to, cling to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + haerere "to stick" (see hesitation). The earliest English use is of persons ("faith is adhesion unto God"), but "Adhesion is generally used in the material, and adherence in the metaphysical sense." [Johnson]

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adherence (n.)

mid-15c., "steady attachment of the mind or feelings to a person, cause, belief, etc.," from Old French adhérence, from Medieval Latin adhaerentia, abstract noun from Latin adhaerent-, stem of adhaerens, present participle of adhaerare "stick to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + haerere "to stick" (see hesitation). Rarely in a physical sense, adhesion being the usual word for that.

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accrue (v.)
Origin and meaning of accrue
formerly also accrew, mid-15c., "to fall to someone as an addition or increment," of property, etc., from Old French acreue "growth, increase, what has grown," fem. of acreu, past participle of acreistre (Modern French accroître) "to increase," from Latin accrescere "grow progressively, increase, become greater," from ad "to" (see ad-) + crescere "grow" (from PIE root *ker- (2) "to grow"). Related: Accrued; accruing.

Apparently an English verb from a French noun because there is no English noun to go with it until much later (the earliest seems to be now-obsolete accrue, 1570s), unless the record is defective. From late 15c. as "happen or result as a natural growth;" from 1881 as "gain by increment, accumulate." Alternative verb accrete "grow by adhesion" (1784) is rare, as is accresce (1630s), from Latin accrescere.
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tawdry (adj.)

"no longer fresh or elegant but worn as if it were so; in cheap and ostentatious imitation of what is rich or costly," 1670s, adjective use of noun tawdry "silk necktie for women" (1610s), shortened from tawdry lace (1540s), an alteration (with adhesion of the -t- from Saint) of St. Audrey's lace, a necktie or ribbon sold at the annual fair at Ely on Oct. 17 commemorating St. Audrey (queen of Northumbria, died 679). Her association with lace necklaces is that she supposedly died of a throat tumor, which, according to Bede, she considered God's punishment for her youthful stylishness:

"I know of a surety that I deservedly bear the weight of my trouble on my neck, for I remember that, when I was a young maiden, I bore on it the needless weight of necklaces; and therefore I believe the Divine goodness would have me endure the pain in my neck, that so I may be absolved from the guilt of my needless levity, having now, instead of gold and pearls, the fiery heat of a tumour rising on my neck." [A.M. Sellar translation, 1907]

Related: Tawdriness.

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