Etymology
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adhere (v.)

1590s, from French adhérer "to stick, adhere" (15c., corrected from earlier aderer, 14c.) or directly from Latin adhaerare "to stick, cling to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + haerere "to stick" (see hesitation). Originally often of persons, "to cleave to a leader, cause, party, etc." (compare adherent (n.), which still often retains this sense). Related: Adhered; adhering.

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inherent (adj.)
1570s, from Latin inhaerentem (nominative inhaerens), present participle of inhaerere "be closely connected with, be inherent," literally "adhere to, cling to," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + haerere "to adhere, stick" (see hesitation). Related: Inherently.
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liposuction (n.)
1983, from Greek lipos "fat, grease" (from PIE root *leip- "to stick, adhere," also used to form words for "fat") + suction (n.).
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lipo- (1)
word-forming element meaning "fat" (n.), from Greek lipos "fat" (n.), from PIE root *leip- "to stick, adhere," also used to form words for "fat."
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clannish (adj.)

1748, "pertaining to a clan; disposed to adhere closely to one another, imbued with prejudices, narrow or restricted in social interests and feeling," from clan + -ish. Related: Clannishly; clannishness.

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lipoma (n.)
"fatty tumor" (plural lipomata), 1830, medical Latin, from Greek lipos "fat" (n.), from PIE root *leip- "to stick, adhere," also used to form words for "fat," + -oma. Related: Lipomatous.
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cleave (v.2)

"to adhere, cling," Middle English cleven, clevien, cliven, from Old English clifian, cleofian "to stick fast, adhere," also figurative, from West Germanic *klibajan (source also of Old Saxon klibon, Old High German kliban, Dutch kleven, Old High German kleben, German kleben "to stick, cling, adhere"), from PIE *gloi- "to stick" (see clay).

The confusion was less in Old English when cleave (v.1) was a class 2 strong verb; but it has grown since cleave (v.1) weakened, which may be why both are largely superseded by stick (v.) and split (v.).

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adhesive (n.)
1881, from adhesive (adj.). Originally of postage stamps, short for adhesive stamp (1840). By 1900 as "a substance that causes to adhere."
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cling (v.)
Old English clingan "hold fast, adhere closely; congeal, shrivel" (strong verb, past tense clang, past participle clungen), from Proto-Germanic *klingg- (source also of Danish klynge "to cluster;" Old High German klinga "narrow gorge;" Old Norse klengjask "press onward;" Danish klinke, Dutch klinken "to clench;" German Klinke "latch").

The main sense shifted in Middle English to "adhere to" (something else), "stick together." Of persons in embrace, c. 1600. Figuratively (to hopes, outmoded ideas, etc.), from 1580s. Of clothes from 1792. Related: Clung; clinging.
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cohesion (n.)

1670s, "act or state of sticking together," from French cohsion, from Latin cohaesionem (nominative cohaesio) "a sticking together," noun of action from past participle stem of cohaerere "to stick together," from assimilated form of com "together" (see co-) + haerere "to adhere, stick" (see hesitation).

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