Etymology
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adequate (adj.)
1610s, "equal to what is needed or desired, sufficient," from Latin adaequatus "equalized," past participle of adaequare "to make equal to, to level with," from ad "to" (see ad-) + aequare "make level," from aequus "equal, even" (see equal (adj.)). The sense is of being "equal to what is required." It shares duty with enough, depending on the subject. With a slightly disparaging tinge, "mediocre, just good enough," by 1900. Related: Adequateness.
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adequacy (n.)
1794; see adequate + abstract noun suffix -cy. Adequateness is from 1670s.
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adequately (adv.)
1620s; see adequate + -ly (2); originally a term in logic in reference to correspondence of ideas and objects and probably based on Latin use. Meaning "suitably" is recorded from 1680s.
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inadequate (adj.)

"not equal to what is required, insufficient to effect the end desired," 1670s; see in- (1) "not, opposite of" + adequate. Related: Inadequately.

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sufficiency (n.)
late 15c., from Late Latin sufficientia, from Latin sufficiens "adequate" (see sufficient) + -cy. Sufficience is from late 14c.
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maladaptive (adj.)

"not exhibiting adequate or appropriate adjustment to a situation or environment," 1912, from mal- + adaptive.

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homestead (n.)
Old English hamstede "home, town, village," from home (n.) + stead (q.v.). In U.S. usage, "a lot of land adequate for the maintenance of a family" (1690s), defined by the Homestead Act of 1862 as 160 acres. Similar formation in Dutch heemstede, Danish hjemsted.
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competence (n.)

1590s, "rivalry" (based on compete), also "adequate supply," both senses now obsolete; 1630s as "sufficiency of means for living at ease," from French compétence, from Latin competentia "meeting together, agreement, symmetry," from competens, present participle of competere, especially in its earlier sense of "fall together, come together, be convenient or fitting" (see compete).

Meaning "adequate range of capacity or ability, sufficiency to deal with what is at hand" is from 1790. Legal sense "capability or fitness to be heard in court" is from 1708.

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sufficient (adj.)
early 14c., from Old French soficient "satisfactory," or directly from Latin sufficientem (nominative sufficiens) "adequate," present participle of sufficere "to supply as a substitute," from sub "up to" (see sub-) + combining form of facere "to make, to do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").
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satispassion (n.)

also satis-passion, 1610s, used by Lancelot Andrewes for "atonement by adequate suffering," from Latin satis pati "to suffer enough," from satis "enough" (from PIE root *sa- "to satisfy") + pati "to endure, undergo, experience," which is of uncertain origin.

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