Etymology
Advertisement
addition (n.)
Origin and meaning of addition

late 14c., "action of adding numbers;" c. 1400, "that which is added," from Old French adition "increase, augmentation" (13c.), from Latin additionem (nominative additio) "an adding to, addition," noun of action from past-participle stem of addere "add to, join, attach" (see add). Phrase in addition to "also" is from 1680s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
additional (adj.)
1640s, "added, supplementary," from addition + -al (1). Related: Additionally.
Related entries & more 
additive (adj.)
1690s, "tending to be added," from Late Latin additivus "added, annexed," from past participle stem of Latin addere "add to, join, attach" (see addition). Alternative addititious "additive, additional" (1748) is from Latin additicius "additional."
Related entries & more 
prosthesis (n.)

1550s, in grammar, "addition of a letter or syllable to a word," from Late Latin, from Greek prosthesis "a putting to, an addition," from prostithenai "add to," from pros "to" (see pros-) + tithenai "to put, to place" (from reduplicated form of PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

From 1706 in medical arts as "the addition of an artificial part to supply a defect of the body" on the notion of "that which is added to" the body. The sense was extended to "artificial body part" by 1900. Plural prostheses.

Related entries & more 
supervention (n.)
1640s, from Late Latin superventionem (nominative superventio), noun of action from past participle stem of supervenire "come in addition to" (see supervene).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
withal (adv.)
"in addition," late 14c., from Middle English with alle (c. 1200), superseding Old English mid ealle "wholly" (see with).
Related entries & more 
supervenient (adj.)
1590s, from Latin supervenientem (nominative superveniens), present participle of supervenire "come in addition to" (see supervene). Related: Superveniently.
Related entries & more 
sesqui- 
word-forming element, from Latin sesqui- "one-half more," contraction of *semis-que- "a half in addition," from semis "a half" (see semi-) + -que "and," from PIE *kwe-.
Related entries & more 
appendicular (adj.)
1650s, from Latin appendicula "a little addition, small appendage," diminutive of appendix (see appendix) + -ar. In anatomy, opposed to axial.
Related entries & more 
connotative (adj.)

1610s, "pertaining to connotation," from Medieval Latin connotativus, from past-participle stem of connotare "to signify in addition to the main meaning;" see connotation. Meaning "implying an attribute while denoting a subject" is from 1829 (J.S. Mill).

Related entries & more